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On memory of negative emotion
Stockholm University.
2000 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The present thesis includes four empirical studies intended to investigate memory of negative emotion. Study 1 investigated the accuracy in memory of circumstantial event information for learning about the news of the M/S Estonia ferry disaster. The purpose was to examine whether accuracy predicts consistent memory of emotions experienced in response to learning the news. A high proportion of respondents successfully recalled the circumstantial information, but accuracy in this respect was not related to consistent recall of emotional reactions. In study 2, the effect of memory-enhancing strategies of the Cognitive Interview (Cl) were investigated on memory of negative emotion. Earlier research have shown that more and correct details about a crime event is elicited from eyewitnesses with the application of the Cl. For this reason, the Cl was applied to examine whether it would equally enhance memory of emotions experienced during a film clip depicting a violent crime. As compared to unassisted recall, emotion was remembered with greater consistency if memory was cued with a visual cue, or with memory-enhancing instructions. Results suggested that memory of prior emotion is easily influenced by the retrieval context. In Study 3, two different kinds of context reinstatement were examined. One consisted of the specific strategy of the mental context reinstatement of the Cl, and the other consisted of the physical reinstatement of an odor that was part of the encoding context. Results suggested that consistent memory of prior emotions was achieved through the use of contextual cues to probe assocations of the episodic memory. Study 4 examined the assumption that memory of emotions is guided by self-schematic knowledge. A screening procedure generated one group of women with self-schema as emotional (Schematics), and another group as neither emotional, nor rational (Aschematics). In the field study, both groups showed consistent memory of emotions experienced during events judged as typical for their lives in general. For events judged as unusual, self-schematic knowledge seemed to have biased memory in accordance with the degree of artiuclation of self as emotional. The laboratory study suggested that Schematics relied on their self-schema, whereas Aschematics tended to base their memory on feeling at recall.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Stockholm University, 2000. , p. 39
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-70275ISBN: 91-7265-165-2 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-70275DiVA, id: diva2:480204
Public defence
2000-10-13, 10:00
Opponent
Note

Härtill 4 uppsatser

Available from: 2012-01-19 Created: 2012-01-19 Last updated: 2018-05-02Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf