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To what extent do core self-evaluations and coping style influence the perception of job insecurity?
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
2011 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background: Job insecurity is a modern day work stressor, experienced by workers worldwide. Over the last few decades, increased flexibility and lack of stability in employment has made job insecurity a work stressor that keeps affecting more and more employees. Increased flexibility and lack of stability in employment makes individuals responsible for staying employable and securing their job. Among the individual-level negative consequences are threats to well-being, health and work attitudes. Stress theory explains how primary and secondary appraisal determines the perception of a stressor and eventual strain. This implicates that how individuals experience and interpret contextual clues influences their perception of job insecurity. The notion of such a link has been supported by previous research where relations between job insecurity and certain personality traits have been found. However, the single trait-approach has been criticized as it makes it difficult to compare results and develop theory further.

Aim: The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between core self-evaluations and job insecurity, and the possible mediating effect of coping style.

Methods: The study investigated to what extent core self-evaluations influence the appraisal of job insecurity in a Swedish sample of white-collar workers (N=425). By applying the Preacher & Hayes’ macro for multiple mediation, the study also tested if there was a mediating effect of coping style on the relation between core self-evaluations and job insecurity. Data was collected in 2004 and 2005.

Results and Conclusion: The results show that core self-evaluations have predictive validity in relation to job insecurity. Core self-evaluations are also associated with task-based coping style. However, no mediating effect of coping style was found on the relation between core self-evaluations and job insecurity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011.
Keyword [en]
core self-evaluations, coping style, job insecurity
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-70923OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-70923DiVA: diva2:483069
Conference
9th International Conference on Occupational Stress and Health, Orlando, May 19-22, 2011
Available from: 2012-01-24 Created: 2012-01-24 Last updated: 2015-07-22Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
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Language
  • de-DE
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Output format
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  • asciidoc
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