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The contribution of educational inequalities to lifespan variation
Max Planck Inst Demog Res, Rostock, Germany .
Univ Amsterdam, Acad MC, Dept Publ Hlth, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
Sodertorn Univ, Stockholm Ctr Hlth Soc Transit, Sodertorn, Sweden .
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2012 (English)In: Population Health Metrics, ISSN 1478-7954, E-ISSN 1478-7954, Vol. 10, no 3Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Studies of socioeconomic inequalities in mortality consistently point to higher death rates in lower socioeconomic groups. Yet how these between-group differences relate to the total variation in mortality risk between individuals is unknown.

Methods

We used data assembled and harmonized as part of the Eurothine project, which includes census-based mortality data from 11 European countries. We matched this to national data from the Human Mortality Database and constructed life tables by gender and educational level. We measured variation in age at death using Theil's entropy index, and decomposed this measure into its between- and within-group components.

Results

The least-educated groups lived between three and 15 years fewer than the highest-educated groups, the latter having a more similar age at death in all countries. Differences between educational groups contributed between 0.6% and 2.7% to total variation in age at death between individuals in Western European countries and between 1.2% and 10.9% in Central and Eastern European countries. Variation in age at death is larger and differs more between countries among the least-educated groups.

Conclusions

At the individual level, many known and unknown factors are causing enormous variation in age at death, socioeconomic position being only one of them. Reducing variations in age at death among less-educated people by providing protection to the vulnerable may help to reduce inequalities in mortality between socioeconomic groups.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 10, no 3
Keyword [en]
Lifespan variation; Life expectancy; Socioeconomic inequality; Education; International variation; Mortality
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-72009DOI: 10.1186/1478-7954-10-3ISI: 000302234400001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-72009DiVA: diva2:488021
Note

10

Available from: 2012-02-01 Created: 2012-02-01 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

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Publisher's full texthttp://www.pophealthmetrics.com/content/10/1/3

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