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Marriage formation as a process intermediary between migration and childbearing
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. (SPaDE)
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
2008 (English)In: Demographic Research, ISSN 1435-9871, Vol. 18, no 21, 611-628 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In studies of differences in fertility between migrants and non-migrants, marriage interferes because migration can be motivated by an impending marriage or can entail entry into a marriage market with new opportunities. One would therefore expect elevated fertility after migration, although a competing theory states that on the contrary fertility ought to be reduced in the time around the move because migration temporarily disturbs the life of the migrant. In any case marriage appears as a process that is intermediary between migration and childbearing. To handle such issues it pays to have a technique that allows the analyst to separate any disruptive effects of migration from any boosting effects of marriage in studies of childbearing. The purposes of the present paper are (i) to remind us that such a technique is available, in fact is straightforward, and (ii) to apply the technique to further analyze a set of data on migration and first-time parenthood in Kyrgyzstan recently used by the second author and Gunnar Andersson. The technique has the neat feature that it allows us to operate with several “clocks” at the same time. In the analysis of first births we keep track of time since migration (for migrants) and time since marriage formation (for the married) beside the respondent’s age (for women at childbearing ages); in other connections there may be more clocks. For such analyses we make use of a flexible graphical housekeeping device that allows the analyst to keep track of a feature like whether migration occurs before or after marriage, or at the same time. This is a half-century-old flow chart of statuses and transitions and is not much more complex than the famous Lexis diagram, which originated with Gustav Zeuner, as we now know. These reflexions were first presented at a symposium dedicated to Professor Zeuner.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 18, no 21, 611-628 p.
Keyword [en]
fertility, Kyrgyzstan, marriage, migration, multiple clocks, statuses-and-transitions flow chart
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-72943OAI: diva2:503729
Available from: 2012-02-16 Created: 2012-02-16 Last updated: 2012-05-03Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Demographic Journeys along the Silk Road: Marriage, Childbearing, and Migration in Kyrgyzstan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Demographic Journeys along the Silk Road: Marriage, Childbearing, and Migration in Kyrgyzstan
2012 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This thesis contributes to the limited demographic literature on Central Asia – the region through which led the great Silk Road – an ancient route of trade and cultural exchange between East and West. We focus on Kyrgyzstan and countries in its immediate neighborhood: Tajikistan and Uzbekistan. We analyze the dynamic interplay between marriage, childbearing, and migration, and examine fertility intentions and intentions to migrate as predictors of demographic outcomes. The thesis consists of four co-authored and one single-authored paper connected through a common theme of ethno-cultural differences in demographic behavior. In the first three studies, we explore the link between migration and family formation. We demonstrate that increased fertility of recent migrants is attributable to marriage-related resettlements. In paper four, we provide an analysis of intentions to move abroad. Our results suggest that ethnicity plays a significant role, independent of other factors, in determining migration plans and preferences, and detect ethnic-specific effects of marriage, childbearing, and social capital on the inclination to migrate. In paper five, we compare the fertility and fertility intentions of ethnic majority and minority groups in three neighboring countries of the region. We explain fertility differentials between ethnic groups in terms of the combined effects of their status in society, country-level differences in institutional settings, and historical and cultural factors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Acta Universitatis Stockholmiensis, 2012. 9 p.
Dissertation series / Stockholm University Demography Unit, ISSN 1404-2304 ; 7
marriage, childbearing, migration, ethno-cultural differences, Kyrgyzstan
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Sociological Demography
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-75723 (URN)978-91-86071-93-6 (ISBN)
Public defence
2012-09-21, hörsal 4, hus B, Universitetsvägen 10 B, Stockholm, 15:00 (English)

At the time of the doctoral defense, the following paper was unpublished and had a status as follows: Paper 5: Manuscript.

Available from: 2012-05-29 Created: 2012-04-25 Last updated: 2015-06-16Bibliographically approved

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Hoem, Jan M.Nedoluzhko, Lesia
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