Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Climate policy in India: what shapes international, national and state policy?
Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
Energy and Resources Institute (TERI), India.
Energy and Resources Institute (TERI), India.
Energy and Resources Institute (TERI), India.
2012 (English)In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 41, no Suppl. 1, 68-77 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

At the international level, India is emerging as a key actor in climate negotiations, while at the national and sub-national levels, the climate policy landscape is becoming more active and more ambitious. It is essential to unravel this complex landscape if we are to understandwhy policy looks the way it does, and the extent to which India might contribute to a future international framework for tackling climate change as well as how internationalparties might cooperate with and support India’s domestic efforts. Drawing on both primary and secondary data, this paper analyzes the material and ideational drivers that are most strongly influencing policy choices at different levels, from international negotiations down to individual states.  We argue that at each level of decision making in India,climate policy is embedded in wider policy concerns. In the international realm, it is being woven into broader foreign policy strategy, while domestically, it is being shaped to serve national and sub-national development interests.  While our analysis highlights some common drivers at all levels, it also finds that their influences over policy are not uniform across the different arenas, and in some cases, they work in different ways at different levels of policy. We also indicate what this may mean for the likely acceptability within India of various climate policies being pushed at the international level.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences , 2012. Vol. 41, no Suppl. 1, 68-77 p.
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-74367DOI: 10.1007/s13280-011-0242-5ISI: 000300278800008OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-74367DiVA: diva2:508479
Available from: 2012-03-08 Created: 2012-03-08 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Atteridge, Aaron
By organisation
Stockholm Environment Institute
In the same journal
Ambio
Environmental Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 109 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf