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Childhood Self-Regulation, Academic Achievement, and Occupational Attainment
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
2012 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The general aim of this thesis was to extend knowledge of the interplay between self-regulation (SR) skills during childhood in relation to academic achievement and later adult educational and occupational attainment.

Previous research has shown that cool SR (i.e., cognitive) is more closely linked to academic achievement than hot SR (i.e., motivational/emotional). However, studies investigating both cool and hot SR in relation to academic achievement have been restricted to young children. Therefore, Study I assessed cool and hot SR in relation to academic achievement over a longer time period. The results showed that cool SR at age 3 was related to achievement already at age 6. Hot SR at age 3 did not predict achievement until later on in elementary school.

Study II investigated the contribution of interference control and attention skills at age 6 to concurrent and later academic achievement at age 10. As the learning material becomes increasingly more complex throughout elementary school and teachers may give less support, interference control was expected to have a delayed effect on academic achievement relative to attention skills. Results showed that attention skills were related to academic achievement at age 6, whereas interference control only predicted academic achievement at age 10.

Study III investigated task persistence in young adolescence in relation to academic achievement later in school and educational and occupational attainment in midlife. Results showed that task persistence contributed to change in grades between ages 13 and 16. Further, task persistence predicted later educational and occupational attainment (men only). Importantly, individual differences in intelligence, motivation, social background, and later educational attainment did not account for these effects. The findings point to a fundamental role of self-regulation in childhood for successful academic achievement and later attainment in adulthood.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Department of Psychology, Stockholm University , 2012. , 75 p.
Keyword [en]
Academic achievement, self-regulation, executive functions, school readiness, occupational attainment, educational attainment
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-75715ISBN: 978-91-7447-493-0 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-75715DiVA: diva2:523693
Public defence
2012-06-05, David Magnussonsalen (U31), hus 8, Frescati Hagväg 8, Stockholm, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note
At the time of doctoral defense, the following papers were unpublished and had a status as follows: Paper 1: Manuscript. Paper 2: Manuscript.Available from: 2012-05-14 Created: 2012-04-25 Last updated: 2012-05-07Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. The Contribution of Hot and Cool Self-Regulation in Early Childhood to Later Academic Achievement
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Contribution of Hot and Cool Self-Regulation in Early Childhood to Later Academic Achievement
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(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The aim of the present study was to investigate the contribution of hot (emotional/motivational) and cool (cognitive) self-regulation in early childhood to lateracademic achievement in kindergarten (math) and late elementary school (math andlanguage). In a sample of 235 preschoolers, higher levels of cool self-regulation predicted better math achievement in kindergarten and this head-start effect persisted into late elementary school. In contrast, higher levels of hot self-regulation predicted better language but not math achievement in late elementary school. These findings support the notion that cool self-regulation is important for the development of academic skills already inkindergarten, whereas the effects on academic achievement of hot self-regulation are delayed, which may be a result of increasing demands through elementary school.

Keyword
self-regulation, academic achievement, school readiness
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology) Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-75443 (URN)
Available from: 2012-04-23 Created: 2012-04-19 Last updated: 2012-05-07Bibliographically approved
2. Complex Interference Control in Kindergarten and Concurrent and Later Academic Achievement
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Complex Interference Control in Kindergarten and Concurrent and Later Academic Achievement
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Several studies have shown the important role of the self-regulatory skill interference control in early childhood for the development of good academic skills. However, few have investigated this relation longitudinally over the period spanning kindergarten through the late school age years. The present study investigated the contribution of complex interference control in kindergarten to concurrent and later academic achievement at age 10. In a sample of 213 kindergartners, complex interference control predicted later, but not concurrent, academic achievement (language, math). Complex interference control and early math achievement were the only significant predictors of later academic achievement. These results are in line with an increased demand throughout elementary school on the child to handle complex and conflicting information. The results also support the notion that there is a developmental lag between the acquisition of complex interference control skills and the ability to apply them in real-life settings.

Keyword
self-regulation, interference control, academic achievement, attention focusing
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-75444 (URN)
Available from: 2012-04-23 Created: 2012-04-19 Last updated: 2012-05-07Bibliographically approved
3. The Role of Task Persistence in Young Adolescence for Successful Educational and Occupational Attainment in Middle Adulthood
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Role of Task Persistence in Young Adolescence for Successful Educational and Occupational Attainment in Middle Adulthood
2011 (English)In: Developmental Psychology, ISSN 0012-1649, E-ISSN 1939-0599, Vol. 47, no 4, 950-960 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The main purpose of the present study was to investigate the importance of task persistence in young adolescence for successful educational and occupational attainment in middle adulthood. Data from age 13 (N = 1,092) and adult age (age 43 for women, N = 569 and age 47 for men, N = 393) were taken from the Swedish longitudinal research program entitled Individual Development and Adaptation. In line with previous research, task persistence was found to be related to changes in grades between age 13 and age 16, over and above other childhood factors. Task persistence at age 13 was also a significant predictor of both income and occupational level in middle adulthood for the men, controlling for a number of childhood factors (including intelligence), and even when educational attainment in adulthood was taken into account. Finally, task persistence was related to educational attainment in adulthood. The authors suggest that task persistence is a second fundamental factor besides general mental ability, influencing attainment within the area of working life and education. The influence of task persistence is discussed in form of personality environment selection mechanisms.

Keyword
task persistence, occupational attainment, educational attainment, personality
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-66972 (URN)10.1037/a0023786 (DOI)000292481800006 ()
Note
authorCount :2Available from: 2011-12-28 Created: 2011-12-22 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

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