Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Toxicity of inorganic aluminium at spring snowmelt—In-stream bioassays withbrown trout (Salmo trutta L.)
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
Uppsala universitet, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik .
2012 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 437, 422-432 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although the acid load has decreased throughout Scandinavia, acidic soils still mobilise aluminium (Al) thatis harmful to brown trout. We hypothesise that there are thresholds for Al toxicity and that the toxicity can betraced from the water content to gill accumulation and the consequential physiological effects. During snowmelt,yearlings were exposed to a gradient of pH and inorganic monomeric Al (Ali) in humic streams to studythe toxic effects and mortality. Gill Al and physiological blood analyses [haemoglobin (Hb), plasma chloride(P-Cl) and glucose (Glu)] were measured. As the water quality deteriorated, Al accumulated on the gills; Hband Glu increased; P-Cl decreased, and mortality occurred. Moribund fish had significantly increased gill Aland Hb, suggesting that respiratory disturbances contributed to mortality. Decreased P-Cl and plasmaavailability indicated an ion regulatory disturbance and possibly circulatory collapse. Ali should be lessthan 20 μg/L, and pH higher than 5.0, to sustain healthy brown trout populations. These thresholds can beused to fine-tune lime dose, as both Ali and pH levels have to be balanced to prevent harm in the recoveringaquatic biota. Although Al is tightly linked to pH, local variation in Al availability in soil and bedrock affectsthe Al release and subsequent toxic Ali episodes in some catchment areas.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 437, 422-432 p.
Keyword [en]
Acidification, Brown trout, Thresholds Ali & pH, Gill accumulation Al, Blood physiology, Liming strategy
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Applied Environmental Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-80527DOI: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2012.08.006ISI: 000310941000048OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-80527DiVA: diva2:556261
Available from: 2012-09-24 Created: 2012-09-24 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Toxicity of Inorganic Aluminium in Humic Streams
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Toxicity of Inorganic Aluminium in Humic Streams
2012 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Aluminium (Al) has been recognised as a main toxic factor alongside pH in acidified water ecosystems. The toxic effect of Al has been attributed to inorganic Al (Ali), though there are few in situ studies in ambient humic waters which are the focus of this thesis.

The aim was to estimate Ali toxicity and thus also Ali concentrations in Swedish humic streams. Subsequently it is necessary to analyse Ali correctly, which was studied by modelling and method intercalibrations. The hypothesis was that the effect of Ali could be followed via physiological effects and Al accumulation, as well as by mortality. Toxicity was studied by in stream exposures of brown trout (Salmo trutta L.) and two salmonid prey organisms (Gammarus pulex and Baetis rhodani) during spring flood.

The modelling of the Ali fraction was performed using monitoring data covering all of Sweden with satisfactory results. The essential variables for Ali modelling were determined; Al, DOC, pH and F, while Fe, Ca and Mg had less effect. The automated analytical procedure for Ali (with cation exchange followed by complexation with pyrocatechol violet) was modified and validated and showed to be the preferred method for laboratory analyses.

To avoid detrimental effects for brown trout Ali should be <20 µg/L and pH >5.0; mortality was high when the Ali was above 50 µg/L. The invertebrates were more sensitive, as mortalities occurred at pH <6.0 and Ali >15 µg/L for G. pulex, and at pH <5.7 and Ali >20 µg/L for B. rhodani. It is prudent to use a wide view and let the most sensitive species set the tolerance limits; a pH above 5.7-6.0 and Ali below 15-20 µg/L allows the stream ecosystems to thrive.

Today, as waters are recovering from acidification, the aim of mitigating liming is to carefully adjust dosage to avoid suboptimal water quality. The thresholds found in this thesis can be used to efficiently but carefully decrease liming, as both Ali and pH levels have to be balanced to sustain the recovering aquatic biota.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM), Stockholm University, 2012. 42 p.
Keyword
Inorganic Al, toxicity, acidification, humic streams
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Applied Environmental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-80651 (URN)978-91-7447-577-7 (ISBN)
Public defence
2012-10-26, De Geer Salen, Geovetenskapens hus, Svante Arrhenius väg 14, Stockholm, 10:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2012-10-04 Created: 2012-09-25 Last updated: 2012-09-25Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Andrén, Cecilia M.
By organisation
Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM)
In the same journal
Science of the Total Environment
Environmental Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 64 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf