Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
High-dose dietary exposure of mice to perfluorooctanoate or perfluorooctane sulfonate exerts toxic effects on myeloid and B-lymphoid cells in the bone marrow and these effects are partially dependent on reduced food Consumption
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
2012 (English)In: Food and Chemical Toxicology, ISSN 0278-6915, E-ISSN 1873-6351, Vol. 50, no 9, 2955-2963 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is well established that exposure of mice to perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) or perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) exerts adverse effects on the thymus and spleen. Here, we characterize the effects of a 10-day dietary treatment with these compounds (0.001-0.02%, w/w) on the bone marrow (BM) of mice. At a dose of 0.02%, both compounds reduced food consumption and caused atrophy of the thymus and spleen. At this same dose, histopathological and flow cytometric analysis revealed that (i) the total numbers of BM as well as the numbers of myeloid, pro/pre B, immature B and early mature B cells were all reduced significantly; and (ii) these adverse effects were reversed either partially or completely 10 days after withdrawal of these compounds. At the lower dose of 0.002%, only PFOA reduced the B-lymphoid cell population. Finally, mice fed an amount of diet equivalent to that consumed by the animals exposed to 0.02% PFOA also exhibited atrophy of the thymus and spleen, and a reduction in the number of B-lymphoid population, without affecting myeloid cells. Thus, in mice, immunotoxic doses of PFOA or PFOS induce adverse effects on the myeloid and B-lymphoid cells in the BM, in part as a consequence of reduced food consumption.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 50, no 9, 2955-2963 p.
Keyword [en]
Perfluorooctane sulfonate, Perfluorooctanoate, Bone marrow, Myeloid cells, B-lymphoid cells, Food restriction
National Category
Food Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-81257DOI: 10.1016/j.fct.2012.06.023ISI: 000308624500001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-81257DiVA: diva2:560610
Note

AuthorCount:4;

Available from: 2012-10-15 Created: 2012-10-15 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Nelson, Buck DeanDePierre, Joseph W.Abedi-Valugerdi, Manuchehr
By organisation
Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics
In the same journal
Food and Chemical Toxicology
Food Science

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 38 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf