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Comparison of stable carbon and oxygen isotopes in Picea glauca tree rings and Sphagnum fuscum moss remains from subarctic Canada
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
2012 (English)In: Quaternary Research, ISSN 0033-5894, E-ISSN 1096-0287, Vol. 78, no 2, 295-302 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Stable isotope ratios from tree rings and peatland mosses have become important proxies of past climate variations. We here compare recent stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios in cellulose of tree rings from white spruce (Picea glauca), growing near the arctic tree line; and cellulose of Sphagnum fuscum stems, growing in a hummock of a subarctic peatland, in west-central Canada. Results show that carbon isotopes in S. fuscum correlate significantly with July temperatures over the past similar to 20 yr. The oxygen isotopes correlate with both summer temperature and precipitation. Analyses of the tree-ring isotopes revealed summer temperatures to be the main controlling factor for carbon isotope variations, whereas tree-ring oxygen isotope ratios are controlled by a combination of spring temperatures and precipitation totals. We also explore the potential of combining high-frequency (annual) climate signals derived from long tree-ring series with low-frequency (decadal to centennial) climate signals derived from the moss remains in peat deposits. This cross-archive comparison revealed no association between the oxygen isotopes, which likely results from the varying sensitivity of the archives to different seasons. For the carbon isotopes, common variance could be achieved through adjustments of the Sphagnum age model within dating error.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 78, no 2, 295-302 p.
Keyword [en]
Stable isotopes, Canadian sub-Arctic, Tree rings, Peat moss
National Category
Geology
Research subject
Quarternary Geology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-81254DOI: 10.1016/j.yqres.2012.05.014ISI: 000308516000015OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-81254DiVA: diva2:560633
Note

AuthorCount:4;

Available from: 2012-10-15 Created: 2012-10-15 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Holocene climate and environmental change in high latitudes as recorded by stable isotopes in peat deposits
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Holocene climate and environmental change in high latitudes as recorded by stable isotopes in peat deposits
2012 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In this thesis, stable carbon and oxygen isotopes in α-cellulose isolated from Sphagnum fuscum moss remains were used as climate proxies. The main focus was to implement the methods in records from high latitude peatlands in the Northern Hemisphere (west-central Canada and north-eastern European Russia), reconstruct palaeoclimate of the studied regions during the Holocene, and evaluate the compatibility of results with other proxy records, especially tree-ring isotope time-series. The variation of stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios (δ13C, δ18O) in different moss plant components was investigated and differences between untreated plants and α-cellulose extracts were evaluated. The impact of peat decay on the stable isotope proxies was studied by colorimetric and chemical (C/N) methods. Temperature reconstructions were developed based on the statistically significant relationship between δ13C and modern summer temperature records. Wet/dry periods were derived from a combination of δ18O records, macrofossil analysis, and a peat humification record in west-central Canada. A tentative reconstruction of snow depth in north-eastern European Russian tundra and northern taiga was based on δ18O records. The most promising result of the thesis is that stable carbon isotope variability in α-cellulose isolated from Sphagnum fuscum stems can be used to reconstruct and quantify palaeotemperatures several millennia back in time and to reveal both long-term and rapid climate shifts from peat archives.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology, Stockholm University, 2012. 36 p.
Series
Dissertations from the Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology, ISSN 1653-7211 ; 32
Keyword
stable isotopes, Holocene, subarctic, climate, Sphagnum fuscum
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Quarternary Geology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-75026 (URN)978-91-7447-472-5 (ISBN)
Public defence
2012-05-11, De Geersalen, Geovetenskapens hus, Svante Arrhenius väg 14, Stockholm, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

At the time of the doctoral defense, the following papers were unpublished and had a status as follows: Paper 3: Submitted. Paper 4: Manuscript.

Available from: 2012-04-19 Created: 2012-04-03 Last updated: 2013-09-20Bibliographically approved

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