Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Vertical shifts in the microbial community structure of organic rich Namibian shelf sediments
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
2012 (English)In: African Journal of Microbiology Research, ISSN 1996-0808, E-ISSN 1996-0808, Vol. 6, no 17, 3887-3897 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigates the diversity and abundance of bacteria in organic-rich Namibian shelf sediments from two sampling stations, using the 16S rRNA library approach and Catalyzed Reporter Deposition Fluorescent in situ Hybridization (CARD-FISH). Six clone libraries were constructed. Clone libraries were dominated by Delta-proteobacteria (up to 48%) and Gamma-proteobacteria (up to 98%). Bacteroidetes were dominant in the clone library of the top 6 cm (up to 17%), while actinobacteria dominated at a depth of 10 to 12 cm (up to 34%). Sequences that were related to bacteria with hydrolytic and fermenting abilities include members from the Gamma-proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, and Acidobacteria. Cloned sequences within the Delta-proteobacteria affiliates to sulfate reducing bacteria, including Desulfarculaceae, Desulfobacteraceae, Desulfobulbaceae, and Desulfuromonadales and were detected throughout the sediment. The two sampling stations differed in microbial diversity with a higher diversity prevailing at the station with higher metabolic rates for organic matter decomposition. At both sampling stations a shift in microbial community composition with depth was observed and is explained by gradients in organic substrate availability within the sediment, which affects the life strategies adopted by bacteria, resulting in niche diversification and ultimately affects bacterial community composition and structure throughout the sediment depth.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 6, no 17, 3887-3897 p.
Keyword [en]
Namibia, upwelling, microbial, diversity, abundance
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-81711DOI: 10.5897/AJMR12.146ISI: 000307402600009OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-81711DiVA: diva2:563784
Note

AuthorCount:3;

Available from: 2012-10-31 Created: 2012-10-30 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Bruchert, Volker
By organisation
Department of Geological Sciences
In the same journal
African Journal of Microbiology Research
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 51 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf