Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Using Novel In Vitro NociOcular Assay Based on TRPV1 Channel Activation for Prediction of Eye Sting Potential of Baby Shampoos
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6298-201X
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6662-0868
Show others and affiliations
2012 (English)In: Toxicological Sciences, ISSN 1096-6080, E-ISSN 1096-0929, Vol. 129, no 2, 325-331 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channel is one of the most well-characterized pain-inducing receptors. The purpose of this study was to predict human eye stinging of 19 baby bath and shampoo formulations by studying TRPV1 activity, as measured by increase in intracellular free Ca2+. The NociOcular test, a novel recombinant neuronal in vitro model with high expression of functional TRPV1 channels, was used to test formulations containing a variety of surfactants, preservatives, and fragrances. TRPV1-specific Ca2+ influx was abolished when the TRPV1 channel antagonist capsazepine was applied to the cells prior to shampoo samples. The positive control, an adult shampoo that contains cocamide monoethanolamine (CMEA), a known stinging ingredient, was the most active sample tested in the NociOcular test. The negative control, a marketed baby shampoo, was negative in the NociOcular and human tests. Seven of the formulations induced stinging in the human test, and of those six were positive in the NociOcular test. Twelve formulations were classified as nonstinging in the human test, and of those ten were negative in the NociOcular test. There was no correlation between the clinical stinging results for the baby formulations and the data generated from other in vitro eye irritation assays (cytosensor microphysiometer, neutral red uptake, EpiOcular, transepithelial permeability). Our data support that the TRPV1 channel is a principal mediator of eye-stinging sensation induced by baby bath and shampoo formulations and that the NociOcular test may be a valuable in vitro tool to predict human eye stinging sensation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 129, no 2, 325-331 p.
Keyword [en]
Eye sting, in vitro assay, nociception, TRPV1, baby shampoo, NociOcular
National Category
Pharmacology and Toxicology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-82117DOI: 10.1093/toxsci/kfs198ISI: 000309037700009OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-82117DiVA: diva2:566760
Note

AuthorCount:8;

Available from: 2012-11-09 Created: 2012-11-08 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Forsby, AnnaLundqvist, Jessica
By organisation
Department of Neurochemistry
In the same journal
Toxicological Sciences
Pharmacology and Toxicology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 73 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf