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Graduate learners’ approaches to genre-analysis tasks: Variations across and within four disciplines
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English. (Centre for Academic English)
2013 (English)In: English for specific purposes (New York, N.Y.), ISSN 0889-4906, E-ISSN 1873-1937, Vol. 32, no 2, 84-96 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Genre-based approaches are widely used in academic writing courses for graduate students. Yet, despite numerous studies of academic discourses and genres, there is still little research focusing on the learner in ESP genre-based instruction, and further consideration of individual learners’ responses to genre pedagogy is needed. This paper reports on a study conducted at a multi-disciplinary humanities faculty. It examines graduate learners’ approaches to “examine-and-report-back” genre-analysis tasks by comparing thirty-two students from four disciplines: archaeology, history, literature, and media studies. The data are subjected to qualitative analysis inspired by the constant comparative method. The overview of features in students’ genre-analysis tasks across the four disciplines is illustrated with excerpts from student writing. Graduate learners’ approaches to genre-analysis fall into two categories: descriptive and analytical. It is shown that graduate learners’ approaches to genre-analysis tasks vary depending on individual students’ capacity to analyse academic texts in relation to their purpose, audience, and disciplinary practices. Another possible factor impacting this variation includes the extent of learners’ understanding of disciplinary knowledge-making practices.  Finally, students’ own aims and learning histories affect the way they approach genre-analysis tasks.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, 2013. Vol. 32, no 2, 84-96 p.
Keyword [en]
genre-analysis task, genre-based instruction, genre awareness, graduate student, disciplinary discourse, academic literacy
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Specific Languages
Research subject
English
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-83133DOI: 10.1016/j.esp.2012.11.004ISI: 000317171600003OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-83133DiVA: diva2:574115
Available from: 2012-12-04 Created: 2012-12-04 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
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  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
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  • asciidoc
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