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Microtubules and microfilaments are both responsible for pollen tube elongation in the coniferPicea abies (Norway spruce)
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Botany.
2000 (English)In: Protoplasma, ISSN 0033-183X, E-ISSN 1615-6102, Vol. 214, no 3, 141-157 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

InPicea abies (Norway spruce), microtubules and actin microfllaments both form a dense matrix throughout the tube mainly parallel to the direction of elongation. In these conifer pollen tubes the organization of this matrix is different from that in angiosperms. This study tests our hypothesis that differences in cytoskeletal organization are responsible for differences in tube growth and physiology. Pollen grains were germinated in media containing cytoskeletal disrupters and analyzed for germination, tube length, tube branching, and tip swelling. Disruption of microtubules significantly inhibits tube elongation and induces tube branching and tip swelling. Tip swelling is probably caused by disruption of the microtubules in the tip that are perpendicular to the direction of elongation. Confocal microscopy indicates that colchicine and propyzamide cause fragmentation of microtubules throughout the tube. Oryzalin and amiprophosmethyl cause a complete loss of microtubules from the tip back toward the tube midpoint but leave microtubules intact from the midpoint back to the grain. Disruption of microfilaments by cytochalasins B and D and inhibition of myosin by N-ethylmaleimide or 2,3-butanedione monoxime stops tube growth and inhibits germination. Microfilament disruption induces short branches in tubes, probably originating from defective microfilament organization behind the tip. In addition, confocal microscopy coupled with microinjection of fluorescein-labeled phalloidin into actively growing pollen tubes indicates that microfllament bundles extend into the plastid-free zone at the tip but are specifically excluded from the growing tip. We conclude that microtubules and microfilaments coordinate to drive tip extension in conifer pollen tubes in a model that differs from angiosperms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2000. Vol. 214, no 3, 141-157 p.
Keyword [en]
Conifer, Microtubule, Microfilament, Myosin, Picea abies, Pollen tube
National Category
Botany
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-83384DOI: 10.1007/BF01279059OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-83384DiVA: diva2:575494
Available from: 2012-12-10 Created: 2012-12-10 Last updated: 2017-12-07

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