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Aging-related increases in behavioral variability: relations to losses of dopamine D1 receptors
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
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2012 (English)In: Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0270-6474, E-ISSN 1529-2401, Vol. 32, no 24, 8186-8191 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Intraindividual variability (IIV) reflects within-person changes in performance, such as trial-by-trial fluctuations on a reaction-time (RT) task. The neural underpinnings of IIV remain largely unknown. The neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) is of particular interest here, as human populations that exhibit DA alterations, such as the elderly, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder children, persons with schizophrenia, and Parkinson patients, also show increased behavioral IIV. We examined links between DA D(1) binding potential (BP) in multiple brain regions and IIV for the control and interference conditions of the Multi-Source Interference Task (MSIT), tapping the cingulo-fronto-parietal attention network. Participants were 18 young and 20 healthy old adults. PET and the radioligand [(11)C]SCH23390 were used to determine D(1) BP. The intraindividual standard deviation (ISD) was computed across successful latency trials of the MSIT conditions, independent of mean RT differences due to age, trial, and condition. Increasing ISDs were associated with increasing age and diminished D(1) binding in several brain regions (anterior cingulate gyrus, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and parietal cortex) for the interference, but not control, condition. Analyses of partial associations indicate that the association between age and IIV in the interference condition was linked to D(1) receptor losses in task-relevant brain regions. These findings suggest that dysfunctional DA modulation may contribute to increased variability in cognitive performance among older adults.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 32, no 24, 8186-8191 p.
National Category
Gerontology, specializing in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-85180DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.5474-11.2012PubMedID: 22699899OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-85180DiVA: diva2:585392
Available from: 2013-01-10 Created: 2013-01-07 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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  • apa
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