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Sleep length, working hours and socio-demographic variables are associated with time attending evening classes among working college students
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. (Biologisk psykologi och behandlingsforskning)
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. (Biologisk psykologi och behandlingsforskning)
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2012 (English)In: Sleep and Biological Rhythms, ISSN 1446-9235, E-ISSN 1479-8425, Vol. 10, no 1, 53-60 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is the aim of the present study to assess factors associated with time spent in class among working college students. Eighty-two working students from 21 to 26 years old participated in this study. They were enrolled in an evening course of the University of São Paulo, Brazil. Participants answered a questionnaire on living and working conditions. During seven consecutive days, they wore an actigraph, filled out daily activity diaries (including time spent in classes) and the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale every three hours from waking until bedtime. Linear regression analyses were performed in order to assess the variables associated with time spent in classes. The results showed that gender, sleep length, excessive sleepiness, alcoholic beverage consumption (during workdays) and working hours were associated factors with time spent in class. Thus, those who spent less time in class were males, slept longer hours, reported excessive sleepiness on Saturdays, worked longer hours, and reported alcohol consumption. The combined effects of long work hours (>40 h/week) and reduced sleep length may affect lifestyles and academic performance. Future studies should aim to look at adverse health effects induced by reduced sleep duration, even among working studentswho spent more time attending evening classes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 10, no 1, 53-60 p.
Keyword [en]
college students, time spent in classes, work and study
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-85921DOI: 10.1111/j.1479-8425.2011.00519.xLocal ID: P2974OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-85921DiVA: diva2:585486
Available from: 2013-01-10 Created: 2013-01-10 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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