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Two effects, one explanation: a study on the effects of intended and actual enactment
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
2012 (English)In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 47, no Supplement 1, 562-562 p.Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Motor-function encoding action phrases, facilitates recollection more than verbal encoding (enactment effect, c.f. Nilsson, 2000). Further, if the phrases are intended to be recalled via motor-function encoding it also leads to higher memory accessibility, referred to as the intention-superiority effect (Goschke & Kuhl, 1993) or the intended enactment effect (Freeman & Ellis, 2003), depending on whether the same process or different processes are assumed to underlie both effects. In three experiments, both effects were studied as a function of list length (18, 30, 60, or 90 items), retrieval measures (free recall, cued recall and recognition). Additionally, different moderator variables for these effects were investigated (familiarity, degree of motor involvement of the action phrases, individual differences in action orientation). Similar effects of intended and actual enactment were found for memory accuracy and accessibility (i.e., response latencies), but the effects were moderated by the nature of the action phrase and action orientation. State-oriented individuals and highly motoric action phrases showed a pronounced (intended) enactment effect. The results, at least partially, support a common explanation for both effects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 47, no Supplement 1, 562-562 p.
Keyword [en]
motor-function encoding, verbal encoding, intention-superiority effect, intended enactment effect, memory, retrieval
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-86941DOI: 10.1080/00207594.2012.709113OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-86941DiVA: diva2:599945
Conference
Special Issue: XXX International Congress of Psychology
Available from: 2013-01-22 Created: 2013-01-22 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Kubik, VeitJönsson, Fredrik U.Nilsson, Lars-Göran
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CiteExportLink to record
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