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Socio-Demographic and Geographical Factors in Esophageal and Gastric Cancer Mortality in Sweden
Karolinska Institutet.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. (Demography Unit)
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
Kings College London.
2013 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 4, e62067- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Socio-demographic factors and area of residence might influence the development of esophageal and gastric cancer. Large-scale population-based research can determine the role of such factors.

Methods

This population-based cohort study included all Swedish residents aged 30–84 years in 1990–2007. Educational level, marital status, place of birth, and place of residence were evaluated with regard to mortality from esophageal or gastric cancer. Cox regression yielded hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), adjusted for potential confounding.

Results

Among 84 920 565 person-years, 5125 and 12 230 deaths occurred from esophageal cancer and gastric cancer, respectively. Higher educational level decreased the HR of esophageal cancer (HR = 0.61, 95%CI 0.42–0.90 in women, HR = 0.71, 95%CI 0.60–0.84 in men) and gastric cancer (HR = 0.80, 95%CI 0.63–1.03 in women, HR = 0.73, 95%CI 0.64–0.83 in men). Being unmarried increased HR of esophageal cancer (HR = 1.64, 95%CI 1.35–1.99 in women, HR = 1.64, 95%CI 1.50–1.80 in men), but not of gastric cancer. Being born in low density populated areas increased HR of gastric cancer (HR = 1.23, 95%CI 1.10–1.38 in women, HR = 1.37, 95%CI 1.25–1.50 in men), while no strong association was found with esophageal cancer. Living in densely populated areas increased HR of esophageal cancer (HR = 1.31, 95%CI 1.14–1.50 in women, HR = 1.40, 95%CI 1.29–1.51 in men), but not of gastric cancer.

Conclusion

These socio-demographic inequalities in cancer mortality warrant efforts to investigate possible preventable mechanisms and to promote and support healthier lifestyles among deprived groups.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 8, no 4, e62067- p.
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Epidemiology; Demography
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-89606DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0062067ISI: 000317908700074OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-89606DiVA: diva2:619138
Projects
Stockholm University SIMSAM Node for Demographic Research (SUNDEM)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 1931016
Available from: 2013-05-02 Created: 2013-05-02 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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