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Eco-certification of farmed seafood: Environmental effects on local and global scale
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences. Gotland University, Sweden.
2013 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University , 2013. , 26 p.
Keyword [en]
aquaculture, eco-certification, LCA, sustainability, mangrove-shrimp, Vietnam
National Category
Biological Sciences Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Marine Ecotoxicology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-90022OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-90022DiVA: diva2:622269
Presentation
2013-06-11, 105, Frescati Backe, Svante Arrhenius väg 21 A, Stockholm, 11:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2013-05-22 Created: 2013-05-20 Last updated: 2016-08-15Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. Eco-certification of Farmed Seafood: Will it Make a Difference?
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Eco-certification of Farmed Seafood: Will it Make a Difference?
2013 (English)In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 42, no 6, 659-674 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Eco-certification is widely considered a tool forreducing environmental impacts of aquaculture, but whatare the likely environmental outcomes for the world’sfastest growing animal-food production sector? This articleanalyzes a number of eco-certification schemes based onspecies choice, anticipated share of the global seafoodmarket, size of eligible producers, and targeted environ-mental impacts. The potential of eco-certification to reducethe negative environmental impacts of aquaculture at scalepresently appears uncertain as: (a) certification schemescurrently focus on species predominantly consumed in theEU and US, with limited coverage of Asian markets; (b)the share of certified products in the market as currentlyprojected is too low; (c) there is an inequitable and non-uniform applicability of certification across the sector; (d)mechanisms or incentives for improvement among theworst performers are lacking; and (e) there is incompletecoverage of environmental impacts, with biophysical sus-tainability and ecosystem perspectives generally lacking.

Keyword
Eco-certification, Aquaculture, Seafood, LCA, Sustainability, Environmental impacts
National Category
Environmental Sciences Biological Sciences
Research subject
Marine Ecotoxicology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-90056 (URN)10.1007/s13280-013-0409-3 (DOI)000323734700001 ()
Available from: 2013-05-20 Created: 2013-05-20 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
2. Mangrove-shrimp farms in Vietnam – comparing organic and conventional systems using life cycle assessment
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mangrove-shrimp farms in Vietnam – comparing organic and conventional systems using life cycle assessment
2015 (English)In: Aquaculture, ISSN 0044-8486, E-ISSN 1873-5622, Vol. 447, 66-75 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Interactions between aquaculture and the environment remain a debated issue, especially in areas where the aquaculture sector is still expanding, such as in the Mekong delta in Vietnam. In response to environmental concerns, various eco-certification schemes have been introduced for seafood, aiming to improve production practices. In order to reflect upon the criteria of these certification schemes, life cycle assessment (LCA) was applied to conventional and certified extensive organic mangrove-shrimp farms in the lower Mekong. In total, 21 organic and 20 non-organic farms were included in the study for evaluation of effects on global warming (including emissions from land transformation and occupation), eutrophication and acidification. Monte Carlo simulations and random sampling were applied to aggregate contributing processes into results. The emissions of greenhouse gasses per ton of shrimp produced were substantial for both groups, and almost solely caused by the release of carbon during mangrove land transformation. Differences in the land area needed to support shrimp production explain the discrepancy. Organic farms emitted less CO2-equivalents (eq.) than the non-organic farms in 75% of the Monte Carlo iterations. Acidification impacts were similar for the two groups, with higher emissions from the non-organic farms in 67% of the iterations. Meanwhile, most mangrove-integrated farms showed a net uptake of eutrophying substances, indicating that both types of mangrove-shrimp production systems are nutrient limited. In order to put the results into perspective, a comparison with intensive and semi-intensive shrimp farms was made. While the extensive mangrove-shrimp farms showed higher emissions of CO2-eq. per ton shrimp produced (20 tons in average for organic and non-organic farms compared to 10 tons from intensive/semi-intensive production), results indicated lower impacts in terms of both acidification and eutrophication. We recommend LCA to be used as a central tool for identifying practices relevant for eco-certification audits, including considerations for land use. However, a better understanding of the consequences of land quality change and linkages to impacts at the ecosystem level e.g. effects on ecosystem services, is needed.

Keyword
Shrimp, Aquaculture, Life cycle assessment, Organic, Eco-certification, Vietnam
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-110831 (URN)10.1016/j.aquaculture.2014.11.001 (DOI)000359496700008 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, SWE- 2011-38
Available from: 2014-12-18 Created: 2014-12-18 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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