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Birth size and survival in breast cancer patients from the Uppsala Birth Cohort Study
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
2013 (English)In: Cancer Causes and Control, ISSN 0957-5243, E-ISSN 1573-7225, Vol. 24, no 9, 1643-1651 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

Previous studies suggest that larger birth size is associated with a higher breast cancer incidence, but studies on birth measures and mortality in breast cancer cases are scarce. This study investigates survival of women after breast cancer diagnosis (n = 437) in the Uppsala Birth Cohort born in 1915–1929.

Methods

Cox regression was used to analyze mortality from any cause after a breast cancer diagnosis. Birth measures including gestational age (GA), birth weight (BW), BW for GA, birth length, and ponderal index (PI) were converted to standard deviation (SD) scores, and all analyses were adjusted for age and calendar time at diagnosis. Analyses were performed with and without adjustment for other birth measures, reproductive history, and adult socioeconomic position.

Results

In fully adjusted analyses, one SD increase in GA was associated with 17 % [95 % confidence interval (CI) 6–26 %] lower mortality and one SD increase in BW was associated with 29 % (7–56 %) higher mortality. PI showed a weaker trend in the same direction: hazard ratio = 1.16 (95 % CI 1.03–1.30).

Conclusions

Our results bring in new evidence that both high GA and low BW predict a better survival in breast cancer cases. Further studies need to investigate mediation of these associations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 24, no 9, 1643-1651 p.
National Category
Health Sciences Environmental Health and Occupational Health Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-90662DOI: 10.1007/s10552-013-0238-5ISI: 000322879200002PubMedID: 23722348OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-90662DiVA: diva2:627095
Note

AuthorCount: 4;

Funding Agencies:

Swedish Research Council  2006-7498

Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research  2007-1010 

Available from: 2013-06-10 Created: 2013-06-10 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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