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The Norway spruce genome sequence and conifer genome evolution
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science (NADA).
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2013 (English)In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 497, no 7451, 579-584 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Conifers have dominated forests for more than 200 million years and are of huge ecological and economic importance. Here we present the draft assembly of the 20-gigabase genome of Norway spruce (Picea abies), the first available for any gymnosperm. The number of well-supported genes (28,354) is similar to the >100 times smaller genome of Arabidopsis thaliana, and there is no evidence of a recent whole-genome duplication in the gymnosperm lineage. Instead, the large genome size seems to result from the slow and steady accumulation of a diverse set of long-terminal repeat transposable elements, possibly owing to the lack of an efficient elimination mechanism. Comparative sequencing of Pinus sylvestris, Abies sibirica, Juniperus communis, Taxus baccata and Gnetum gnemon reveals that the transposable element diversity is shared among extant conifers. Expression of 24-nucleotide small RNAs, previously implicated in transposable element silencing, is tissue-specific and much lower than in other plants. We further identify numerous long (>10,000 base pairs) introns, gene-like fragments, uncharacterized long non-coding RNAs and short RNAs. This opens up new genomic avenues for conifer forestry and breeding.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 497, no 7451, 579-584 p.
National Category
Natural Sciences Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-91836DOI: 10.1038/nature12211ISI: 000319556100035OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-91836DiVA: diva2:635719
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationSwedish Research CouncilFormasSwedish Foundation for Strategic Research Science for Life Laboratory - a national resource center for high-throughput molecular bioscience
Note

AuthorCount:56;

Available from: 2013-07-05 Created: 2013-07-04 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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