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Having to stop driving at night because of dangerous sleepiness - awareness, physiology and behaviour
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. (Biologisk psykologi och behandlingsforskning)
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
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2013 (English)In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 22, no 4, 380-388 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A large number of accidents are due to the driver falling asleep at the wheel, but details of this link have not been studied on a real road. The purpose of the present study was to describe the development of sleepiness indicators, leading to the drive being terminated prematurely by the onboard expert driving instructor because of imminent danger. Eighteen individuals participated during a day drive and a night drive on a motorway (both 90 min). Eight drivers terminated (N) prematurely (after 43 min) because of sleep-related imminent danger [according to the driving instructor or their own judgement (two cases)]. The results showed very high sleepiness ratings (8.5 units on the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale) immediately before termination (<7 at a similar time interval for those 10 who completed the drive). Group N also showed significantly higher levels of sleep intrusions on the electroencephalography/electro-oculography (EEG/EOG) than those who completed the drive (group C). The sleep intrusions were increased in group N during the first 40 min of the night drive. During the day drive, sleep intrusions were increased significantly in group N. The night drive showed significant increases of all sleepiness indicators compared to the day drive, but also reduced speed and driving to the left in the lane. It was concluded that 44% of drivers during late-night driving became dangerously sleepy, and that this group showed higher perceived sleepiness and more sleep intrusions in the EEG/EOG.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 22, no 4, 380-388 p.
Keyword [en]
blinks, car, electroencephalograph, fatigue, Karolinska Drowsiness Score, Karolinska Sleepiness Scale, lateral variability
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-92536DOI: 10.1111/jsr.12042ISI: 000321773200004PubMedID: 23509866Local ID: P3008OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-92536DiVA: diva2:639577
Available from: 2013-08-08 Created: 2013-08-08 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Akerstedt, TorbjörnSchwarz, Johanna F AKecklund, Göran
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