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Seasonal and interannual variability of elemental carbon in the snowpack of Storglaciaren, northern Sweden
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
2013 (English)In: Annals of Glaciology, ISSN 0260-3055, E-ISSN 1727-5644, Vol. 54, no 62, 50-58 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We studied the variability of elemental carbon (EC) over 3 years (2009-11) in the winter snowpack of Storglaciaren, Sweden. The goal of this study was to relate the seasonal variation in EC to specific snow accumulation events in order to improve understanding of how different atmospheric circulation patterns control the deposition of EC. Specifically, we related meteorological parameters (e.g. wind direction, precipitation) to snow physical properties, EC content, stable-isotope 8180 ratios and anion concentrations in the snowpack. The distribution of EC in the snowpack varied between years. Low EC contents corresponded to a predominance of weather systems originating in the northwest, i.e. North Atlantic. Analysis of single layers within the snowpacks showed that snow layers enriched in heavy isotopes coincided predominantly with low EC contents but high chloride and sulfate concentration. Based on this isotopic and geochemical evidence, snow deposited during these events had a strong oceanic, i.e. North Atlantic, imprint. In contrast, snow layers with high EC content coincided with snow layers depleted in heavy isotopes but high anion concentrations, indicating a more continental source of air masses and origin of EC from industrial emissions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 54, no 62, 50-58 p.
National Category
Physical Geography Geology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-92668DOI: 10.3189/2013AoG62A229ISI: 000321685300009OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-92668DiVA: diva2:640745
Note

AuthorCount:4;

Available from: 2013-08-14 Created: 2013-08-14 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Ingvander, SusanneRosqvist, GunhildDahlke, Helen E.
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