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Predicting Life Satisfaction During Middle Adulthood from Peer Relationships During Mid-Adolescence
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
2013 (English)In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601, Vol. 42, no 8, 1299-1307 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The immediate advantages of adolescent friendships and disadvantages of peer rejection are well documented, but there is little evidence that these effects extend into adulthood. This study tested the hypothesis that peer relationships during adolescence predict life satisfaction during middle adulthood, using data from a 30-year prospective longitudinal study. Participants included 996 (49.5 % female) 8th grade students from a community sample of Swedish youth. Self-reports of friendship and peer reports of rejection were obtained when participants were age 15. Self-reports of global life satisfaction and perceived relationship quality were collected at age 43 for women and age 48 for men. Path analyses tested a direct-effects model that examined links from adolescent friendship participation and peer rejection to middle adulthood outcomes, and a buffered-effects model that examined links from adolescent peer rejection to middle adulthood outcomes, separately for those with and without friends during adolescence. Strong support emerged for the buffered-effects model but not the direct-effects model. Adolescent friendship participation moderated associations between adolescent peer rejection and adult global life satisfaction and between adolescent peer rejection and adult perceived relationship quality such that peer rejection predicted poorer adult outcomes for youth without friends but not for youth with friends. The findings suggest that the risks of peer rejection-and benefits of friendship-extend from adolescence well into middle age.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 42, no 8, 1299-1307 p.
Keyword [en]
Adolescent friendship, Peer rejection, Adult life satisfaction, Friends, Peers
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-92915DOI: 10.1007/s10964-013-9969-6ISI: 000321973800015OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-92915DiVA: diva2:644354
Note

AuthorCount:4;

Available from: 2013-08-30 Created: 2013-08-26 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Zettergren, PeterBergman, Lars R.
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CiteExportLink to record
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  • apa
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