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Partial Sleep Restriction Activates Immune Response-Related Gene Expression Pathways: Experimental and Epidemiological Studies in Humans
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2013 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 10, e77184- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Epidemiological studies have shown that short or insufficient sleep is associated with increased risk for metabolic diseases and mortality. To elucidate mechanisms behind this connection, we aimed to identify genes and pathways affected by experimentally induced, partial sleep restriction and to verify their connection to insufficient sleep at population level. The experimental design simulated sleep restriction during a working week: sleep of healthy men (N = 9) was restricted to 4 h/night for five nights. The control subjects (N = 4) spent 8 h/night in bed. Leukocyte RNA expression was analyzed at baseline, after sleep restriction, and after recovery using whole genome microarrays complemented with pathway and transcription factor analysis. Expression levels of the ten most up-regulated and ten most down-regulated transcripts were correlated with subjective assessment of insufficient sleep in a population cohort (N = 472). Experimental sleep restriction altered the expression of 117 genes. Eight of the 25 most up-regulated transcripts were related to immune function. Accordingly, fifteen of the 25 most up-regulated Gene Ontology pathways were also related to immune function, including those for B cell activation, interleukin 8 production, and NF-kappa B signaling (P<0.005). Of the ten most up-regulated genes, expression of STX16 correlated negatively with self-reported insufficient sleep in a population sample, while three other genes showed tendency for positive correlation. Of the ten most down-regulated genes, TBX21 and LGR6 correlated negatively and TGFBR3 positively with insufficient sleep. Partial sleep restriction affects the regulation of signaling pathways related to the immune system. Some of these changes appear to be long-lasting and may at least partly explain how prolonged sleep restriction can contribute to inflammation-associated pathological states, such as cardiometabolic diseases.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 8, no 10, e77184- p.
National Category
Natural Sciences
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-96885DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0077184ISI: 000326037000048Local ID: P3065OAI: diva2:667894


Funding Agencies:

EU LSHM-CT-2005-518189, QLK6-CT-2000-00499; Finska Lakaresallskapet; Finnish Work Environment Fund; Instrumentarium Foundation; Jalmari and Rauha Ahokas Foundation; Biomedicum Helsinki Foundation; Emil Aaltonen Foundation  Finnish foundation for Cardiovascular research  Paavo Nurmi Foundation; Finnish Brain Foundation; GPBM graduate school; Marie Curie ESRS project 046036; Academy of Finland Center of Excellence in Complex Disease Genetics 213506,129680; Sigrid Juselius Foundation; Academy of Finland 251217, 129494, 139635, 137575 

Available from: 2013-11-28 Created: 2013-11-28 Last updated: 2013-11-28Bibliographically approved

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van Leeuwen, Wessel M. A.
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Stress Research Institute
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