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Sleep loss and subjective health
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Centre for Family Medicine, Sweden.
2013 (English)In: Brain, behavior, and immunity, ISSN 0889-1591, E-ISSN 1090-2139, Vol. 32, e22Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Both insufficient sleep and subjective health predict mortality and are related to sickness-like symptoms as well as immune activation. Cross-sectional data show a strong association between sleep and subjective health, but there is a lack of experimental data that may distinguish causation from association. We investigated the effects of restricted sleep on subjective health in two experimental studies. The first study consisted of 23 subjects (11 women) who rated their subjective health twice, once after 31 h of wakefulness and once after normal sleep (8 h sleep/night). The second study had 25 subjects (14 women) who rated their subjective health after two consecutive nights with 4 h sleep/night and after normal sleep (8 h sleep/night). In the group deprived of sleep for 31 h, participants rated themselves as less healthy that day (−1.7 on a 7-point scale, p < 0.01) compared to after normal sleep. In the group with partially restricted sleep, participants also rated their health as worse compared to after normal sleep, both their current health (−0.8 on a 7-point scale, p < 0.05) and general health (−0.6 on a 5-point scale, p < 0.05). This study shows that an experimental reduction of sleep, complete as well as partial, leads to poorer subjective health. Considering the predictive qualities of this measure, future studies should determine the underlying mechanisms of the connection between insufficient sleep and worse subjective health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 32, e22
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-98558DOI: 10.1016/j.bbi.2013.07.088Local ID: P3100OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-98558DiVA: diva2:684387
Conference
PsychoNeuroImmunology Research Society's 20th Annual Scientific Meeting, Stockholm, Sweden, June 5-8, 2013
Available from: 2014-01-08 Created: 2014-01-08 Last updated: 2017-05-15Bibliographically approved

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