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Work and sleep – the effects of stress, physical work environment and work hours: A prospective study using the SLOSH database
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
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2013 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

METHODS: Data was derived from two waves of SLOSH (The Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health), a representative sample of the working population in Sweden. Respondents in the present study sample were gainfully employed in both 2008 (T1) and in 2010 (T2), and without sleep disturbances at T1 (n=5741, 54 % women, 46 % men, aged 24-72 years). Between T1 and T2 a total number of 441 people (8 %) developed sleep disturbances. Logistic regression was made in five hierarchical models with new cases of disturbed sleep as the dependent variable. Factors studied were changes in physical work environment, work hours, demands, control, support and stress between T1 and T2; increased or decreased levels of exposure, as well as consistently high or low levels. RESULTS: In the fully adjusted model, stress showed the strongest association with new cases of disturbed sleep. Increased stress levels had an OR of 2.9 (95% CI 2.0-4.3) and consistently high levels of stress had an OR of 2.8 (1.9-4.2). Increased levels of demands showed a weaker association, OR=1.8 (1.2-2.6), whereas consistently high levels of demands did not show significant results. Decreased levels of social support showed an increased OR of 2.3 (1.6-3.3), as did consistently low levels of social support with an OR of 1.6 (1.1-2.3). Neither changes in control nor changes in work hours showed any significant results. Increased exposure to excessive heat, cold or draught showed a OR of 1.7 (1.1-2.8) whereas changes in heavy physical labour, noise at work, and poor or excessively bright light did not show an association with new cases of sleep disturbances in the fully adjusted model.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013.
Keyword [en]
sleep, recovery, work environment
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-99438OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-99438DiVA: diva2:686972
Conference
Forum för arbetslivsforskning (FALF) - Changes in Working Life: Individual, Organizational, and Methodological Perspectives, Stockholm, Sweden, June 17-19, 2013
Available from: 2014-01-13 Created: 2014-01-13 Last updated: 2017-04-12Bibliographically approved

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Garefelt, JohannaÅkerstedt, TorbjörnWesterlund, HugoMagnusson Hanson, LindaSverke, MagnusKecklund, Göran
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Stress Research InstituteDepartment of Psychology
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