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Signs of sinusitis in times of urbanization in Viking Age-early medieval Sweden
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
2013 (English)In: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238, Vol. 40, 4457-4465 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The influence and possible negative impact on sinus health of living conditions in rural and urban environments in Viking Age (AD 800–1050) and Early Medieval Sweden (AD 1050–1200) is investigated. Skeletal samples from 32 rural settlements in the Mälaren Valley (AD 750–1200) and burials in the nearby proto-urban port of trade Birka (AD 750–960) are examined. Based on the diagnostic criteria for maxillary sinusitis used in earlier studies, the results show that there is no significant difference in the prevalence of signs of sinusitis between the two materials (i.e. the Mälaren Valley versus Birka). Consequently, this provides no evidence that living in a proto-urban environment had a negative impact on sinus health. However, when compared with previously studied samples from the early medieval town Sigtuna, dated to AD 970–1100, the populations of the Mälaren Valley and Birka show significantly lower frequencies of bone changes interpreted as chronic maxillary sinusitis (95%, 70% and 82% respectively). This implies that the urban environment of Sigtuna could have led to impaired sinus health. There is also a significant difference between males and females in the Birka material, in which more females (100%) than males (68%) were affected. A gender based differentiation in work tasks is suggested by this, or exposure to environmental risk factors that affect sinus health. No difference between males and females could be detected in the samples from the Mälaren Valley and Sigtuna.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 40, 4457-4465 p.
National Category
Humanities
Research subject
Osteoarchaeology; Archaeology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-99743DOI: 10.1016/j.jas.2013.06.010ISI: 000328015000030OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-99743DiVA: diva2:688328
Projects
People in transition - life in the Mälaren Valley in the stage of preurbanism (A.D. 800-1100)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, diarienr 2008-1346
Available from: 2014-01-16 Created: 2014-01-16 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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