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Carbon cycling in the Baltic Sea - The fate of allochthonous organic carbon and its impact on air-sea CO2 exchange
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm University Baltic Sea Centre, Baltic Nest Institute.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM). Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm University Baltic Sea Centre, Baltic Nest Institute.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm University Baltic Sea Centre, Baltic Nest Institute.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM). Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm University Baltic Sea Centre, Baltic Nest Institute.
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2014 (English)In: Journal of Marine Systems, ISSN 0924-7963, E-ISSN 1879-1573, Vol. 129, 289-302 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A coupled physical-biogeochemical model (BALTSEM) is used to estimate carbon fluxes in the Baltic Sea over the 1980-2006 period. Budget calculations for organic carbon indicate that of the total allochthonous organic carbon (TOCT) supplied to the system, on average 56% is mineralized, 36% is exported out of the system, and the remainder is buried. River discharge is the main source of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) to the Baltic Sea. However, model results indicate that in the Gulf of Bothnia (northern Baltic Sea), the contribution to the DIC stock by TOCT mineralization is of the same order as direct river input of DIC In the Kattegat and Danish Straits (southwestern Baltic Sea) on the other hand, net uptake of atmospheric CO2 comprises the major DIC source. Despite large variations within the system, with net outgassing from some sub-basins and net absorption in others, the Baltic Sea as a whole was estimated to be a net sink for atmospheric CO2. Mineralization of allochthonous dissolved organic carbon (DOCT) influences air-sea CO2 exchange. A sensitivity study indicates that depending on the labile fraction of DOCT, the contribution from CO2 absorption to total external DIC sources can amount to 10-25%.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 129, 289-302 p.
Keyword [en]
Baltic Sea, Modelling, Oceanography, Biogeochemistry, Organic carbon, Carbon cycling
National Category
Biological Sciences Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-100870DOI: 10.1016/j.jmarsys.2013.07.005ISI: 000329881600027OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-100870DiVA: diva2:697608
Note

AuthorCount:5;

Available from: 2014-02-18 Created: 2014-02-17 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Gustafsson, ErikDeutsch, BarbaraGustafsson, Bo G.Humborg, ChristophMörth, Carl-Magnus
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Baltic Nest InstituteDepartment of Applied Environmental Science (ITM)Department of Geological Sciences
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Journal of Marine Systems
Biological SciencesEarth and Related Environmental Sciences

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