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Access to safe water in rural Bangladesh: An intersectional analysis of the arsenic crisis in rural Bangladesh
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
2014 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

 The purpose of this thesis is to study the intersectional impact of the arsenic crisis and the access to safe water in rural Bangladesh. Particular focus is set on the gender-related differences in the impact of arsenicosis. In order to also understand how different groups of women are affected by the arsenic crisis an intersectional analysis is utilized. The empirical data was collected during a qualitative case study in six arsenic acute villages in southwest Bangladesh. The study has applied a feminist geographical conceptual framework and utilized semi structured interviews and focus groups as primary methods: 49 semi structured interviews and 16 focus groups. Additional information has been gathered through observations and secondary sources. The results of the study indicate that the arsenic crisis and the access to safe water are aggravating gender inequalities as well as gender roles and responsibilities. The gender inequalities related to arsenicosis are particularly manifested in the access to health care and in the degree of social stigmatization: women are the biggest victims, and unmarried women in particular. The study also concludes that multiple axes of oppression such as class, disability, age and race should additionally be considered along with gender when studying the impact of the arsenic crisis on women. Along with gender oppression these additional groups of oppression are the most important ones in determining the magnitude of the negative impact of the arsenic crisis on women.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. , 32 p.
Keyword [en]
Gender-Water, Arsenic Crisis, Arsenicosis, Unsafe Water, Rural Bangladesh, Intersectionality
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-101082OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-101082DiVA: diva2:698762
Available from: 2014-02-25 Created: 2014-02-25 Last updated: 2014-02-25Bibliographically approved

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