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Preference for hiring approach: Cognitive style or context dependent?
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Södertörns högskola.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Despite consistent research evidence for the superiority of a mechanical hiring approach using standardized methods for collecting and combining data about job applicants, a clinical approach, relying on professional judgment, is predominating in selection practice. Identifying crucial factors driving practitioners’ preferences is a pre-requisite for guiding actions aimed at increasing the level of acceptancy and use of a mechanical approach. The results in this study showed that practitioners with an intuitive decision-making style prefer a clinical approach, while contextual aspects, accountability for the selection process and responsibility for the selection decision, did not impact practitioners’ preferences. Thus, individuals who rely on feelings and hunches in their everyday decisions also prefer intuitive judgments professionally, regardless pressure of accountability and responsibility. 

Keyword [en]
Decision-making style, procedural accountability, decision responsibility, preferred hiring approach, personnel selection.
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-101974OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-101974DiVA: diva2:706083
Available from: 2014-03-18 Created: 2014-03-18 Last updated: 2014-03-20Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Utilizing research in the practice of personnel selection: General mental ability, personality, and job performance
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Utilizing research in the practice of personnel selection: General mental ability, personality, and job performance
2014 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Identifying and hiring the highest performers is essential for organizations to remain competitive. Research has provided effective guidelines for this but important aspects of these evidence-based processes have yet to gain acceptance among practitioners. The general aim of this thesis was to help narrowing the gap between research and practice concerning personnel selection decisions. The first study compared the validity estimates of general mental ability (GMA) and the five factor model of personality traits as predictors of job performance, finding that, when the recently developed indirect correction for range restriction was applied, GMA was an even stronger predictor of job performance than previously found, while the predictive validity of the personality traits remained at similar levels. The approach used for data collection and combination is crucial to forming an overall assessment of applicants for selection decisions and has a great impact on the validity of the decision. The second study compared the financial outcomes of applying a mechanical or clinical approach to combining predictor scores. The results showed that the mechanical approach can result in a substantial increase in overall utility. The third study examined the potential influences that practitioners’ cognitive decision-making style, accountability for the assessment process, and responsibility for the selection decision had on their hiring approach preferences. The results showed that practitioners scoring high on intuitive decision-making style preferred a clinical hiring approach, while the contextual aspects did not impact practitioners’ preferences. While more research may be needed on practitioner preferences for a particular approach, the overall results of this thesis support and strengthen the predictive validity of GMA and personality traits, and indicate that the mechanical approach to data combination provides increased utility for organizations. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, 2014. 77 p.
Keyword
Personnel selection, job performance, correction for range restriction, general mental ability, personality, clinical and mechanical data collection, clinical and mechanical data combination, utility, preference for hiring approach
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-101976 (URN)978-91-7447-883-9 (ISBN)
Public defence
2014-04-25, David Magnussonsalen (U31), Frescati Hagväg 8, Stockholm, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

At the time of the doctoral defense, the following papers were unpublished and had a status as follows: Paper 2: Manuscript. Paper 3: Manuscript.

Available from: 2014-04-03 Created: 2014-03-18 Last updated: 2014-04-22Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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