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Friendship network characteristics and psychological well-being in late adolescence: Exploring differences by gender and gender composition
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
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2014 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 42, no 2, 146-154 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: The aim of the present study was to examine the association between friendship networks and psychological well-being among 19-year-olds. Methods: The data used was a random sample of Swedish individuals born in 1990 who answered a questionnaire in 2009-2010. Friendship networks were considered in terms of three measures of emotional support. Six statements about the individual's emotional state were used to create a summary measure of psychological well-being. Gender and gender composition were included as potentially moderating factors. The association between friendship networks and psychological well-being was analysed by means of linear regression analysis (n = 1289). Results: The results indicate that males' and females' friendship networks were similar with regard to quality and trust, whereas males' networks were characterized by less self-disclosure and a stronger preference for same-gender friendships. Gender composition did not matter for the support levels. Emotional support was associated with psychological well-being but there were gender differences: females seemed to benefit more health-wise from having high-quality (and trusting) networks. Moreover, whereas self-disclosure among males was positively linked to well-being, this was not the case among females. None of these associations were moderated by gender composition. Conclusions: In sum, friendship networks are beneficial for the psychological well-being among late adolescents, but there are some important differences according to gender.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2014. Vol. 42, no 2, 146-154 p.
Keyword [en]
Emotional support, friendship, gender differences, late adolescence, psychological well-being, social networks
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-102476DOI: 10.1177/1403494813510793ISI: 000331371600005OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-102476DiVA: diva2:710615
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareEU, European Research Council
Note

AuthorCount:5;

Available from: 2014-04-07 Created: 2014-04-07 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved

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Almquist, Ylva B.Östberg, VivecaRostila, MikaelRydgren, Jens
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Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS)Department of Sociology
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