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The long-term evolution of neutron star merger remnants - II. Radioactively powered transients
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
2014 (English)In: Monthly notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, ISSN 0035-8711, E-ISSN 1365-2966, Vol. 439, no 1, 757-770 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We use 3D hydrodynamic simulations of the long-term evolution of neutron star merger ejecta to predict the light curves of electromagnetic transients that are powered by the decay of freshly produced r-process nuclei. For the dynamic ejecta that are launched by tidal and hydrodynamic interaction, we adopt grey opacities of 10 cm(2) g(-1), as suggested by recent studies. For our reference case of a 1.3-1.4 M-circle dot merger, we find a broad IR peak 2-4 d after the merger. The peak luminosity is approximate to 2 x 10(40) erg s(-1) for an average orientation, but increased by up to a factor of 4 for more favourable binary parameters and viewing angles. These signals are rather weak and hardly detectable within the large error box (similar to 100 deg(2)) of a gravitational wave trigger. A second electromagnetic transient results from neutrino-driven winds. These winds produce 'weak' r-process material with 50 < A < 130 and abundance patterns that vary substantially between different merger cases. For an adopted opacity of 1 cm(2) g(-1), the resulting transients peak in the UV/optical about 6 h after the merger with a luminosity of approximate to 10(41) erg s(-1) (for a wind of 0.01 M-circle dot) These signals are marginally detectable in deep follow-up searches (e. g. using Hypersuprime camera on Subaru). A subsequent detection of the weaker but longer lasting IR signal would allow an identification of the merger event. We briefly discuss the implications of our results to the recent detection of a near infrared (nIR) transient accompanying GRB 130603B.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 439, no 1, 757-770 p.
Keyword [en]
nuclear reactions, nucleosynthesis, abundances, gamma-ray burst: general, stars: neutron
National Category
Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-102975DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stt2503ISI: 000333297700072OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-102975DiVA: diva2:714550
Note

AuthorCount:4;

Available from: 2014-04-28 Created: 2014-04-25 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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Korobkin, OlegRosswog, Stephan
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