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THOU SHALLT NOT SELL NATURE: A STUDY ON HOW TABOO TRADE-OFFS AFFECT OUR PRO-ENVIRONMENTAL BEHAVIOUR
Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
2014 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Background: Humans are part of social-ecological systems, and preferably these systems are resilient, as this increases security of societal benefits derived from them. However, ecosystem-resilience is often threatened by loss/degradation of natural areas. Ideally, nature is only developed after careful cost/benefit analyses, but non-marketable ecosystem-services are often left unaccounted in land-development plans, resulting in loss of these systems and services. One solution is incorporating ecosystem-services into cost/benefit analyses by putting a price-tag on these services. However, people do not accept the ensuing trade-offs, which pit sacred values (nature) against secular values (money). Such (taboo) trade-offs are morally offensive, yet they are necessary if we want to preserve ecosystems from ongoing degradation. 

Moral cleansing – attempts to reaffirm one’s own moral position - is a reaction towards taboo trade-offs (i.e. in the shape of donations to charities) However, little is known about people’s behavioural response to assaults on sacred values related to the environment. 

Aim: This study focuses on how trade-offs between environmental ‘sacred’ values and monetary values affect expressions of moral cleansing, namely pro-environmental behaviour in the shape of donations to an environmental charity. It investigates whether taboo trade-offs have effects on people’s environmental donations, and consequently the relative importance of trade-offs in such behaviour compared to other behaviour-influencing factors. Laboratory experiments (N=139) were conducted followed by regression analyses, and Multimodel-Inference techniques for data-analysis. 

Conclusion: Participants’ decision-to-donate to an environmental charity is affected by social consciousness and taboo trade-offs. Thus taboos are a factor influencing donation behaviour. 

Discussion: Results suggest that people with a non-anthropocentric worldview believe that they ought to donate more, but in reality, other factors influence the real decision-to-donate. In this study it is exposure to a taboo trade-off and social consciousness that affects the real decision-to-donate. This supports prior evidence for moral cleansing effects and expands it to environmental fields. It also shows the added use of the explorative MMI-approach in social science-topics. Societal applicability is found in improvement of CBAs, and potential usage as behaviour-change technique. However, such usage deserves more attention on practicalities, feasibility and ethics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014.
Keyword [en]
social-ecological systems, trade offs
National Category
Environmental Sciences Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-105529OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-105529DiVA: diva2:728703
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2014-06-24 Created: 2014-06-24 Last updated: 2014-06-24Bibliographically approved

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