Change search
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Fin whale MDH-1 and MPI allozyme variation is not reflected in the corresponding DNA sequences
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6716-6345
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology.
Show others and affiliations
2014 (English)In: Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 4, no 10, 1787-1803 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The appeal of genetic inference methods to assess population genetic structure and guide management efforts is grounded in the correlation between the genetic similarity and gene flow among populations. Effects of such gene flow are typically genomewide; however, some loci may appear as outliers, displaying above or below average genetic divergence relative to the genomewide level. Above average population, genetic divergence may be due to divergent selection as a result of local adaptation. Consequently, substantial efforts have been directed toward such outlying loci in order to identify traits subject to local adaptation. Here, we report the results of an investigation into the molecular basis of the substantial degree of genetic divergence previously reported at allozyme loci among North Atlantic fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus) populations. We sequenced the exons encoding for the two most divergent allozyme loci (MDH-1 and MPI) and failed to detect any nonsynonymous substitutions. Following extensive error checking and analysis of additional bioinformatic and morphological data, we hypothesize that the observed allozyme polymorphisms may reflect phenotypic plasticity at the cellular level, perhaps as a response to nutritional stress. While such plasticity is intriguing in itself, and of fundamental evolutionary interest, our key finding is that the observed allozyme variation does not appear to be a result of genetic drift, migration, or selection on the MDH-1 and MPI exons themselves, stressing the importance of interpreting allozyme data with caution. As for North Atlantic fin whale population structure, our findings support the low levels of differentiation found in previous analyses of DNA nucleotide loci.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 4, no 10, 1787-1803 p.
Keyword [en]
Adaptation, marine mammals, metabolic enzymes, outlier loci, population structure, selection
National Category
Ecology Microbiology
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-105934DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1046ISI: 000336491600006OAI: diva2:733194


Available from: 2014-07-08 Created: 2014-07-08 Last updated: 2014-07-08Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Olsen, Morten Tange
By organisation
Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology
In the same journal
Ecology and Evolution

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

Altmetric score

Total: 25 hits
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link