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Nurses' Practice Environment and Work-Family Conflict in Relation to Burn Out: A Multilevel Modelling Approach
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
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2014 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 5, e96991- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To investigate associations between nurse work practice environment measured at department level and individual level work-family conflict on burnout, measured as emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and personal accomplishment among Swedish RNs. Methods: A multilevel model was fit with the individual RN at the 1st, and the hospital department at the 2nd level using cross-sectional RN survey data from the Swedish part of RN4CAST, an EU 7th framework project. The data analysed here is based on a national sample of 8,620 RNs from 369 departments in 53 hospitals. Results: Generally, RNs reported high values of personal accomplishment and lower values of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. High work-family conflict increased the risk for emotional exhaustion, but for neither depersonalization nor personal accomplishment. On department level adequate staffing and good leadership and support for nurses reduced the risk for emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. Personal accomplishment was statistically significantly related to staff adequacy. Conclusions: The findings suggest that adequate staffing, good leadership, and support for nurses are crucial for RNs' mental health. Our findings also highlight the importance of hospital managers developing policies and practices to facilitate the successful combination of work with private life for employees.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 9, no 5, e96991- p.
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-105921DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0096991ISI: 000336653300057Local ID: P-3145OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-105921DiVA: diva2:733252
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, Swedish Council for Working Life and Social ResearchForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1077 550Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1758EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 223468
Note

AuthorCount:6;

Available from: 2014-07-08 Created: 2014-07-08 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved

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