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The impact of involuntary exit from employment in later life on the risk of major depression and being prescribed anti-depressant medication
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
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2015 (English)In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 19, no 5, 381-389 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: Involuntary employment exit in later life has been shown to be a risk factor for poor physical and mental health. This study aims to examine the relationship between involuntary employment exit in later life and subsequent risk of reporting major depression or being prescribed anti-depressant medication (ADM). Method: Data were drawn from four waves of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH). This is a nationally representative longitudinal cohort survey of persons employed in Sweden in 2003 and 2005. The sample was restricted to respondents who had exited the labour market aged 50+ years between 2006 and 2012 (N = 1433). Major depression was measured using the Symptom Checklist Core Depression Scale (SCL-CD6). Prescription ADM redeemed from a pharmacy was based on the National Prescribed Drug Register. Results: After controlling for socio-demographic variables, health, health behaviours, and baseline depression, involuntary employment exit was associated with an increased risk of reporting major depression (OR 3.16; CI 1.32-7.61) and becoming newly prescribed ADM (HR 2.08; CI 1.03-4.21) compared to voluntary employment exit. Conclusion: Involuntary employment exit represents a risk for subsequent depression in later life. Mental health and social services ought to consider identifying these individuals for possible intervention programs to reduce the burden of depression in later life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 19, no 5, 381-389 p.
Keyword [en]
general, psychological and social aspects, depression
National Category
Gerontology, specializing in Medical and Health Sciences Psychology Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-106157DOI: 10.1080/13607863.2014.927821ISI: 000349032800001PubMedID: 24946236Local ID: P-3143OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-106157DiVA: diva2:735176
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2014-07-23 Created: 2014-07-23 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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