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Increased alcohol use over the past 20 years among the oldest old in Sweden
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
Number of Authors: 4
2014 (English)In: Nordisk Alkohol- og narkotikatidsskrift (NAT), ISSN 1455-0725, E-ISSN 1458-6126, Vol. 31, no 3, 245-260 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS - Increased alcohol consumption among old people, reported in many countries, will likely present a major challenge to public health and policy in the future. In Sweden, current knowledge about old people's alcohol consumption is incomplete because of limited historical data and a dearth of nationally representative studies. We describe the frequency of alcohol consumption among the oldest old in Sweden over a 20-year period by sex, age, education, living situation, mobility and Activities of Daily Living. METHODS - We used repeated cross-sectional survey data from the Swedish Panel Study of Living Conditions of the Oldest Old (SWEOLD), conducted in 1992, 2002 and 2011. The samples were nationally representative of the Swedish population aged 77+, with response rates of 95.4%, 84.4% and 86.2% (total n = 2007). Self-reported consumption frequency was measured with the question How often do you drink alcoholic beverages, such as wine, beer or spirits? RESULTS - Frequency of alcohol consumption increased among the oldest old from 1992 to 2011. The proportion reporting no or less-than-monthly alcohol consumption decreased, whereas the proportion reporting weekly consumption increased. This was true for men, women and most age and educational groups. The period change in consumption frequency was not explained by changes in demographic factors, living situation or functional capacity during the study period. CONCLUSIONS - Alcohol use increased among the oldest old in Sweden during the 20-year study period. More liberal attitudes toward alcohol could contribute to the increased use. The increase in weekly alcohol consumers suggests an increase in the number of older risk consumers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 31, no 3, 245-260 p.
Keyword [en]
alcohol consumption, trends in consumption frequency, the oldest old, socio-demographic groups, nationally representative sample
National Category
Substance Abuse Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-106429DOI: 10.2478/nsad-2014-0020ISI: 000338433700003OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-106429DiVA: diva2:736321
Note

AuthorCount:4;

Available from: 2014-08-06 Created: 2014-08-04 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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