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Linking self-reported stress to aggregate cortisol measures and recurrent pain in midadolescent girls and boys
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
2014 (English)In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 21, no S1, S179-S180 p., P605Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Previous research has developed an 11-item self-report measure assessing activation and pressure stress among adolescents. However, the biological correlates of this measure are unclear. Considering this, the present study investigated how perceived stress relates to aggregate cortisol measures and recurrent pain in mid-adolescent girls and boys. Methods: Mid-adolescents (119 girls and 56 boys) provided self-ratings of activation and pressure stress and recurrent pain (headache, stomachache, neck/shoulder and back pain) in questionnaires. Additionally, adolescents sampled saliva during an ordinary school day: 1) immediately at awakening, 2) 30 minutes after waking up, 3) 60minutes after waking up, and 4) at 8 p.m. Aggregate cortisol measures including ground and increase measures of the area under the curve and a diurnal slope measure were computed. Hierarchical regression analyseswere performed for girls and boys respectively. Results: Activation and pressure were significantly associated with recurrent pain in girls but not in boys. However, there were no significant associations between self-ratings of stress and salivary cortisol, neither for girls nor for boys. Conclusion:While self-rated activation and pressure stress were related to recurrent pain in girls, but not in boys, neither activation nor pressure was linked to any of the aggregate cortisol measures. The differences between subjective and objective measures perhaps relate to these measures reflecting distinct and unrelated aspects of functioning. However, the findings may also result from the participants being mid-adolescents whose bodily systems are flexible and still unaffected by daily activation and pressure stress.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 21, no S1, S179-S180 p., P605
Keyword [en]
cortisol, activation stress, pressure stress
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-108500DOI: 10.1007/s12529-014-9418-2OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-108500DiVA: diva2:759208
Conference
ICBM 2014 Meeting
Available from: 2014-10-29 Created: 2014-10-29 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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Lindfors, PetraFolkesson, LisaÖstberg, Viveca
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