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Cognitive predictors of medical decision-making capacity in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Care Sciences and Society, Sweden.
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2014 (English)In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, ISSN 0885-6230, E-ISSN 1099-1166, Vol. 29, no 12, 1304-1311 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Impaired capacity to make decisions in everyday life and situations of medical treatment is an inevitable consequence of the cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The objective of this study was to identify the most powerful cognitive component(s) that best predicted medical decision-making capacity (MDMC) in patients with AD and mild cognitive impairment.

Method: Three groups of subjects participated in the study: patients with AD (n = 20), mild cognitive impairment (n = 21), and healthy control subjects (n = 33). MDMC was assessed by the linguistic instrument for medical decision-making (LIMD) and related to demographics and 27 cognitive test measures.

Results: The cognitive tests were found to aggregate into four components using a principle component analysis. The four components, which correspond to verbal knowledge, episodic memory, cognitive speed, and working memory, accounted for 73% of the variance in LIMD according to a stepwise regression analysis. Verbal knowledge was the most powerful predictor of LIMD (beta = 0.66) followed by episodic memory (beta = 0.43), cognitive speed (beta = 0.32), and working memory (beta = 0.23). The best single test as shown by the highest correlation with LIMD was Reading speed (R = 0.77).

Conclusion: Multiple factors are involved in MDMC in subjects with cognitive impairment. The component of verbal knowledge was the best predictor of MDMC and Reading speed was the most important single cognitive test measurement, which assessed both rapid Reading and understanding of text.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 29, no 12, 1304-1311 p.
Keyword [en]
medical decision-making capacity, Alzheimer's disease, cognitive predictors, verbal knowledge, text reading
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-109634DOI: 10.1002/gps.4114ISI: 000345214600015OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-109634DiVA: diva2:765939
Available from: 2014-11-25 Created: 2014-11-25 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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