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Alcohol consumption and NHMRC Guidelines: has the message got out, are people conforming and are they aware that acohol causes cancer?
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
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2014 (English)In: Australian and New Zealand journal of public health, ISSN 1326-0200, E-ISSN 1753-6405, Vol. 38, no 1, 66-72 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To examine self-reported alcohol consumption and relationships betweenconsumption, awareness of the 2009 NHMRC guidelines of no more than two standard drinksper day, drinking in excess of the guideline threshold and perceptions of alcohol as a risk factorfor cancer.

Methods: Questions were included in annual, cross-sectional surveys of about 2,700 SouthAustralians aged 18 years and over from 2004 to 2012. Consumption data for 2011 and 2012were merged for the majority of analyses.

Results: In 2011 and 2012, 21.6% of adults drank in excess of the guideline threshold (33.0%males; 10.7% females). While 53.5% correctly identified the NHMRC consumption thresholdfor women, only 20.3% did so for men (39.0% nominated a higher amount). A large minoritysaid they did not know the consumption threshold for women (39.2%) or men (40.4%). In2012, only 36.6% saw alcohol as an important risk factor for cancer. Important predictors ofexcess consumption for men were: higher household income; and not perceiving alcohol as animportant risk factor for cancer. Predictors for women were similar but the role of householdincome was even more prominent.

Conclusions: Men were nearly three times as likely to drink in excess of the guidelines aswomen. The majority of the population did not see an important link between alcoholand cancer. Awareness of the latest NHMRC guidelines consumption threshold is still low,particularly for men.

Implications: A strategy to raise awareness of the NHMRC guidelines and the link betweenalcohol and cancer is warranted.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Richmond: Wiley-Blackwell, 2014. Vol. 38, no 1, 66-72 p.
Keyword [en]
Alcohol consumption, NHMRC guidelines, income, cancer risk.
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-109783DOI: 10.1111/1753-6405.12159OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-109783DiVA: diva2:767369
Available from: 2014-12-01 Created: 2014-12-01 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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