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Quantification of neurotoxin BMAA (beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine) in seafood from Swedish markets
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry.
2014 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 4, 6931- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The neurotoxin beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) produced naturally by cyanobacteria, diatoms and dinoflagellates can be transferred and accumulated up the food chain, and may be a risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases. This study provides the first systematic screening of BMAA exposure of a large population through the consumption of seafood sold in metropolitan markets. BMAA was distinguished from known isomers by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry after acidic hydrolysis and derivatization. Using deuterium-labeled internal standard, BMAA was quantified as 0.01-0.90 mu g/g wet weight of tissues in blue mussel, oyster, shrimp, plaice, char and herring, but was undetectable (<0.01 mu g/g) in other samples (salmon, cod, perch and crayfish). Provided that the content of BMAA detected is relevant for intake calculations, the data presented may be used for a first estimation of BMAA exposure through seafood from Swedish markets, and to refine the design of future toxicological experiments and assessments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 4, 6931- p.
National Category
Analytical Chemistry
Research subject
Analytical Chemistry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-110174DOI: 10.1038/srep06931ISI: 000344315200003OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-110174DiVA: diva2:787274
Note

AuthorCount:4;

Available from: 2015-02-09 Created: 2014-12-08 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Mass Spectrometry of Non-protein Amino Acids: BMAA and Neurodegenerative Diseases
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mass Spectrometry of Non-protein Amino Acids: BMAA and Neurodegenerative Diseases
2015 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Neurodegenerative diseases have been shown to correlate positively with an ageing population. The most common neurodegenerative diseases are amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease. The cause of these diseases is believed to be the interaction between genetic and environmental factors, synergistically acting with ageing. BMAA (β-methylamino-L-alanine) is one kind of toxin present in our environment and might play an important role in the development of those diseases.

BMAA was initially isolated from cycad seeds in Guam, where the incidence of ALS/Parkinsonism-dementia complex among the indigenous people was 50 – 100 times higher than the rest of the world in the 1950’s. BMAA can induce toxic effects on rodents and primates. Furthermore, it can potentiate neuronal injury on cell cultures at concentrations as low as 10 µM. BMAA was reported to be produced by cyanobacteria, and could bio-magnify through the food chain.

In this thesis, work was initially focused on the improvement of an existing analytical method for BMAA identification and quantification using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.  Subsequently, the refined method was applied to environmental samples for probing alternative BMAA producer(s) in nature and to seafood samples for estimation of human exposure to this toxin.

In Paper I, a systematic screening of the isomers of BMAA in a database was performed and seven potential isomers were suggested. Three of them were detected or suspected in natural samples. In Paper II, a deuterated internal standard was synthesized and used for quantifying BMAA in cyanobacteria. In Paper III, Diatoms were discovered to be a BMAA producer in nature. In Paper IV, ten popular species of seafood sold in Swedish markets were screened for BMAA. Half of them were found to contain BMAA at a level of 0.01 – 0.90 µg/g wet weight. In Future perspectives, the remaining questions important in this field are raised.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry, Stockholm University, 2015. 43 p.
Keyword
Neurodegenerative diseases, BMAA, Isomers, LC-MS/MS, Cyanobacteria, Diatoms, Seafood contamination
National Category
Analytical Chemistry
Research subject
Analytical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-114110 (URN)978-91-7649-028-0 (ISBN)
Public defence
2015-04-09, Magnélisalen, Kemiska övningslaboratoriet, Svante Arrheniusväg 16 B, Stockholm, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2015-03-18 Created: 2015-02-20 Last updated: 2015-03-20Bibliographically approved

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