Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Foreign background and criminal offending among young males in Stockholm
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4513-1501
2015 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This doctoral thesis considers how factors from the home country, the family, and the individual impact the risk for criminal offending among young males from a foreign background residing in Stockholm. I use Swedish register data to examine the risk for police registered suspicion of criminal offending. The introductory chapter presents an historical overview of immigration in Sweden, theories of criminal offending, and details about analysis of register data. It is followed by three empirical studies that consider unique risk factors for crime among children of immigrants while controlling for factors encountered within Sweden. The first study shows that young male children of immigrants do not seem to be inherently violent as a result of coming from a war-torn country. The second study indicates that it is not the age at immigration, but the family situation that seems to dictate criminal propensity. The final study suggests that threats of deportation and stricter immigration policies do not seem to deter criminality. The most interesting result was probably that high home country human development was a protective factor against crime. This is the first known work to uncover such a result. Future theoretical development may be best aimed at unpacking and empirically evaluating the human development index as a risk factor. Together, these three studies suggest that some previously unconsidered uniquely immigrant factors are related to risk for criminality. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Department of Criminology, Stockholm Univeristy , 2015. , 52 p.
Series
Avhandlingsserie / Kriminologiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet, ISSN 1404-1820 ; 37
Keyword [en]
immigrants and crime, foreign background, criminology
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Criminology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-113490ISBN: 978-91-7649-114-0 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-113490DiVA: diva2:794216
Public defence
2015-04-22, hörsal 4, hus B, Universitetsvägen 10 B, Stockholm, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

At the time of the doctoral defense, the following paper was unpublished and had a status as follows: Paper 2: Manuscript.

Available from: 2015-03-30 Created: 2015-02-03 Last updated: 2015-04-07Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. Correlates of War? Towards an understanding of nativity-based variation in immigrant offending
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Correlates of War? Towards an understanding of nativity-based variation in immigrant offending
2013 (English)In: European Journal of Criminology, ISSN 1477-3708, E-ISSN 1741-2609, Vol. 10, no 4, 408-423 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study uses Swedish register data to assess the impact of war in the home country on the individual likelihood of registered violent crime among young male immigrants in Stockholm, Sweden. War in the home country during a migrant’s residence is significantly related to a higher likelihood of registration for a violent crime. However, these results were not sustained in a sensitivity analysis, which considered serious property crime. Analysis of the history of war in the home country produces effects opposite to those predicted, with more years of war reducing the likelihood of violent crime. These findings indicate that war is capturing other factors, within the home or the receiving country, that may be related to violent crime.

Keyword
correlates of war, immigrant crime, nativity effect
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Criminology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-97933 (URN)10.1177/1477370812470902 (DOI)
Projects
Foreign background and criminal offending among young males in Stockholm
Available from: 2013-12-19 Created: 2013-12-19 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
2. Age at Immigration and Crime in Stockholm using Sibling Comparisons
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Age at Immigration and Crime in Stockholm using Sibling Comparisons
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Past research has shown that immigrants who arrive at a later age are less likely to commit crime than those who arrive at an earlier age. Segmented assimilation theory argues that the family and neighborhood may be important factors affecting how age at immigration and crime are related to one another. This study used population-based register data for foreign-background males from Stockholm to test the effect of age at immigration on crime. The effect of age at immigration on police registered suspicion for crime was evaluated while considering family and neighborhood factors. Initial results showed that people who immigrated around age 4 were the most likely to be suspected of a crime. When controlling for family characteristics, it seemed that a later age at immigration was tied to a lower likelihood of crime. The result, however, was not statistically significant. The results imply that future research on entire families may be a worthwhile endeavor.

National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Criminology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-114798 (URN)
Available from: 2015-03-10 Created: 2015-03-10 Last updated: 2015-03-11Bibliographically approved
3. Deterrence Versus Marginalization: evidence From Immigrant Offending
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Deterrence Versus Marginalization: evidence From Immigrant Offending
2015 (English)In: Race and Justice, E-ISSN 2153-3687, Vol. 5, no 3, 278-300 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Immigration policies that attach citizenship and deportation consequences to crime may be aimed at deterring crime, but they also effectively marginalize immigrants and may promote crime. Evidence from Sweden and around the world indicates that, where citizenship is concerned, marginalization may have won out. This research used a population-based sample of approximately 20,000 Swedish males and more rigorous methods than past studies to test the effects of citizenship and region of origin on official police suspicion for a serious crime. The findings showed that a lack of citizenship is related to greater involvement in crime, indicating support for the marginalizing effects of immigration policies. Yet, the region of origin results presented a conflicting picture in which neither ideas on deterrence nor marginalization could be supported. In conclusion, neither the potential deterrent effects of immigration policy nor its marginalizing effects were strongly supported.

Keyword
immigration and crime, social control theory, criminological theories, immigration, crime control model, race and courts, get-tough
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Criminology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-113488 (URN)10.1177/2153368714568354 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-02-03 Created: 2015-02-03 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(899 kB)834 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT02.pdfFile size 899 kBChecksum SHA-512
a1799b4c541fdc7b996b5beb783cf27f27a34dc326573d84fdb917107ccce5bf4c64c4064d39004978ba589768a07db688feb174f25bcb45af277e228dc8ff64
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Beckley, Amber
By organisation
Department of Criminology
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 834 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

isbn
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

isbn
urn-nbn
Total: 1309 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf