Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The effect of local and landscape level land-use composition on predatory arthropods in a tropical agricultural landscape
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
2015 (English)In: Landscape Ecology, ISSN 0921-2973, E-ISSN 1572-9761, Vol. 30, no 1, 167-180 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It has been suggested that the composition of different non-crop land-use types along with tree density regulate local biodiversity in agricultural landscapes. However, specific data is limited, not least from tropical regions. We examined how different land-use types and forest cover at different scales influenced the abundance and species composition of predatory arthropods in 40 homegardens of southwest Ethiopia. We collected specimens using pitfall traps during two separate months and related sample composition to land-use in the vicinity (1 ha plot, local scale, field data) and tree cover within 200 and 500 m radius zones (landscape scale, satellite data). Spiders, beetles and ants were most common. A high abundance of ants was found in tree-rich homegardens while the variation in abundance of spiders was best explained by the interaction between tree cover at the local and landscape scales. The highest spider abundances were found when either the homegarden or the surroundings had high tree-cover and was lower in both the most tree-rich and tree-poor landscape-garden combinations. In addition, open non-crop cover (mostly grasslands) and ensete (a banana-like perennial crop) favored spiders. This pattern demonstrates that different land-use types at different scales can interact to create variations in biodiversity across an agricultural landscape. To enhance numbers of predatory arthropods in homegardens, which may be beneficial for natural pest control, our results suggest that different strategies are needed depending on the target group or species. Grasslands, ensete fields and tree-rich habitats seem to play important roles.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 30, no 1, 167-180 p.
Keyword [en]
Ant, Activity abundance, Beetle, Species composition, Spider, Tropics
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-113699DOI: 10.1007/s10980-014-0115-yISI: 000347284600013OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-113699DiVA: diva2:796287
Note

AuthorCount:3;

Available from: 2015-03-18 Created: 2015-02-09 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Pests and pest controlling organisms across tropical agroecological landscapes in relation to forest and tree-cover
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pests and pest controlling organisms across tropical agroecological landscapes in relation to forest and tree-cover
2014 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

A major challenge in agroecosystems is how to manage the systems so that it reduces crop pests and enhances natural pest control. This thesis investigates patterns of crop pests and top-down effects of birds and arthropod predators in relation to land-use composition across spatial scales. In paper (I) I examined the crop distribution and land-use types in relation to the crop raiding patterns in 15 transectsin sites close to and far from forests along with a questionnaire survey at household level. I found severe crop raiding close to forests, but it had no impact on crop composition growing between the two sites. In paper (II) I examined the effect of forest and tree cover, at local and landscape scales, on the abundance of arthropod predators by collecting specimens from 40 home gardens. My result showed higher abundance of arthropod predators when either the home garden or the surroundings had a high tree-cover, compared to when tree-cover at both scales was similarly either high or low. In paper (III) I investigated the effect of excluding birds and arthropod predators on leaf damage on rape seed in 26 home gardens. I found stronger top-down impacts from arthropod predators on crop pests in tree-poor gardens than in tree-rich gardens. There was no effect of birds. In paper (IV) I explored the effect of landscape complexity on bird and arthropod predation using plasticine caterpillars in 36 home gardens across landscapes. The rate of arthropod predation on caterpillars was higher in simple than in complex landscapes. The rate of bird predation did not vary between complex and simple landscapes. In simple landscapes, arthropod predation was higher than that of birds. The overall results suggest that simplified gardens/landscapes still have enough habitat heterogeneity to support arthropod predators for the significant top-down controlling effect on crop pests. However, I did not find clear effect of complexityon the top-down effect of birds.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University, 2014. 38 p.
Keyword
activity abundance, crop raiding, exclosure experiment, homegarden, leaf damage, predation, spatial scales, structural complexity
National Category
Biological Sciences
Research subject
Plant Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-102849 (URN)978-91-7447-881-5 (ISBN)
Public defence
2014-06-05, Lecture Hall, Lilla Frescativägen 5, Stockholm, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Funder
Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency, SWE-2009-134Swedish Research Council Formas, 229-2009-991
Note

At the time of the doctoral defence the following papers were unpublished and had a status as follows: Paper 1: Manuscript; Paper 3: Manuscript; Paper 4: Manuscript

Available from: 2014-05-14 Created: 2014-04-23 Last updated: 2016-02-03Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Lemessa, DebissaHambäck, Peter A.Hylander, Kristoffer
By organisation
Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences
In the same journal
Landscape Ecology
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 95 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf