Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Wide ranging stopover movements and substantial fuelling in first year garden warblers at a northern stopover site
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Ethology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9741-4431
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Ethology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Ethology.
2015 (English)In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 46, no 3, 315-322 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Migratory birds use stopovers to replenish their fuel reserves and they generally spend more time at stopover sites than theydo in actual fl ight. When arriving at a new stopover site birds may need to search extensively to fi nd a suitable feeding areaand this search and settling period may aff ect the duration of stopover. Stopover behaviour can thus have profound eff ectson the migratory programme and studies on stopover behaviour are important to understand migratory strategies. Wefollowed 51 fi rst-year garden warblers Sylvia borin with radio-transmitters at an autumn stopover site on the island ofGotland in southern Sweden. Our aim was to determine the distance birds relocated from the coastal capture site whensearching for an area to settle in, and also to establish the duration of stopover and put it in relation to refuelling rate byrecapturing a subset of the radio-tracked individuals. Sixteen birds made an extended stopover ( 2 d), relocated inlandfrom the capture site and settled on average 5.6 km from the capture site, with the longest recorded relocation being fourteenkilometres. Birds that relocated nocturnally settled in areas further away than birds that relocated diurnally. Th irteenbirds that continued migration after a short stop carried larger fuel stores than birds that stopped over longer and theyremained close to the capture site until departure. Th ree birds were re-trapped and showed high fuelling rates, between0.3 and 1.1 g d 1 . Th ey left the stopover site with fuel loads between 40 – 56 percent of lean body mass, which possiblywould have allowed them to reach the Mediterranean area without additional refuelling stops.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 46, no 3, 315-322 p.
National Category
Behavioral Sciences Biology
Research subject
Ethology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-115963DOI: 10.1111/jav.00492ISI: 000355622400011OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-115963DiVA: diva2:801155
Available from: 2015-04-08 Created: 2015-04-08 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Migratory routes and stopover behaviour in avian migration
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Migratory routes and stopover behaviour in avian migration
2016 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Migratory birds, some small and light weight as matchboxes, engage in seasonal inter-continental journeys in order to take advantage of the long summer days and abundance of food at northern latitudes to breed and raise their young, and then escape the harsh winters by migrating to lower latitudes. This thesis deals with two important aspects of migration, the routes taken during migration and the birds’ behaviour at stopovers. The migratory routes are for many species unknown, whole or in part, and this is especially true for species that migrate nocturnally. At stopovers birds replenish fuel reserves that powers migratory flight, and studying how birds utilise stopovers is important in order to understand how migration is organised. In this thesis I have used modern tracking technology to study both continental wide movements of thrush nightingales (Luscinia luscinia) and common rosefinches (Carpodacus erythrinus) using small light-level geolocators, and smaller scale movements at a single stopover site of garden warblers (Sylvia borin) using miniature radio-transmitters. I have also studied the fuelling behaviour of garden warblers during autumn migration in the field and in the lab, and great reed warblers (Acrocephalus arundinaceus) at a stopover site on Crete during spring migration after the Sahara crossing. The thesis discusses the significance of several aspects of migration shown by the birds that would have been very difficult to detect without the aid of modern tracking technology, such as loop migration, prolonged stops during migration, multiple wintering sites, and nocturnal relocations at stopover sites. Studies carried out at stopover sites also show that garden warblers and great reed warblers can attain large fuel loads even at sites where they have no barrier to cross and this might be a result of good foraging conditions. The thesis also highlights the importance of combining different techniques when studying stopover behaviour to get reliable estimates on stopover durations and fuel deposition rates as well as the importance of choosing sites preferred by birds when planning stopover studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Department of Zoology, Stockholm University, 2016. 49 p.
Keyword
Bird migration, migration routes, stopover, geolocator, radio telemetry, tracking, fuel deposition
National Category
Behavioral Sciences Biology
Research subject
Ethology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-126975 (URN)978-91-7649-333-5 (ISBN)
Public defence
2016-04-08, Vivi Täckholmsalen (Q-salen), NPQ-huset, Svante Arrhenius väg 20, Stockholm, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

At the time of the doctoral defense, the following papers were unpublished and had a status as follows: Paper 4: Manuscript. Paper 5: Manuscript.

Available from: 2016-03-18 Created: 2016-02-18 Last updated: 2017-02-24Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Stach, RobertJakobsson, SvenKullberg, Cecilia
By organisation
Ethology
In the same journal
Journal of Avian Biology
Behavioral Sciences Biology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 155 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf