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Psychological and existential vulnerability among clinical young women: a quantitative comparison of depression-related subgroups
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
2015 (English)In: Mental Health, Religion & Culture, ISSN 1367-4676, E-ISSN 1469-9737, Vol. 18, no 4, 259-272 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The objective was to explore psychological and existential vulnerability among clinical young women in Sweden. Females (n = 53) with depression as the most common preliminary diagnosis were investigated through an online questionnaire. Included measures were Karolinska Scales of Personality, Self-concept, Strategies to Handle Negative Emotions, Sense of Coherence, and questions pertaining to existential meaning-making, including religious/spiritual belief. The sample was divided into High (n = 35) and Low/Inter (n = 18) groups according to scores on the anxiety- and depression-related personality scale Inhibition of aggression. Using independent samples t-test, the High group showed signs of significantly higher psychological and existential vulnerability than the Low/Inter group. Salutogenic factors being (1) coming from socially and societally engaged families and (2) being in a functional existential meaning-making process. The conclusion is that vulnerabilities in the psychological and existential domains are linked, especially in individuals high on depression-like aspects of personality. However, no significant differences for religion/spirituality were found. Treatment implications were addressed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 18, no 4, 259-272 p.
Keyword [en]
Clinical young women, psychological vulnerability, existential meaning-making, depression, sense of coherence, self-concept, emotion regulation
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-117208DOI: 10.1080/13674676.2015.1021313OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-117208DiVA: diva2:811932
Available from: 2015-05-13 Created: 2015-05-13 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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