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Changes in Mental and Physical Well-Being Among Problematic Alcohol and Drug Users in 12-Month Internet-Based Intervention Trials
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
2015 (English)In: Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, ISSN 0893-164X, E-ISSN 1939-1501, Vol. 29, no 1, 97-105 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Twelve-month well-being outcomes were investigated for 835 participants in 1 of 2 randomized controlled trials offering online assessment and brief intervention for either problematic alcohol (n = 633) or drug use (n = 202). The well-being of participants who had reduced their substance use to a less problematic level (regardless of intervention) over 12 months was compared with that of participants who had maintained or increased their use. At a 12-month follow-up, the 227 alcohol trial participants with reduced use showed better well-being in comparison to the 406 with stable or increased use, in physical health and sleep quality, as well as general well-being, ability to concentrate, lower stress, better social life satisfaction and sense of control, and a lower rate of depressed mood. Among the 70 drug trial participants who had reduced their drug use over 12 months, 80% had ceased all drug use, and at follow-up they had fewer alcohol-related problems than the stable group. No differences in well-being between these groups were identified. Self-reported access to additional treatment modalities beyond the trial interventions (e.g., speaking to someone about problematic use and accessing additional Internet-based interventions) was higher among participants in both cohorts with reduced substance use in comparison to those with stable/increased use. Drug users who reduced their use accessed prescribed medication to a larger extent than those whose use remained stable or increased. Points to consider when conducting future research on well-being and problematic substance use are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 29, no 1, 97-105 p.
Keyword [en]
substance use, randomized controlled trials, Internet-based intervention, well-being, treatment
National Category
Psychology Substance Abuse
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-117396DOI: 10.1037/a0038420ISI: 000352318200012PubMedID: 25664387OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-117396DiVA: diva2:815275
Note

AuthorCount:3;

Available from: 2015-05-29 Created: 2015-05-19 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved

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