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Timing of flowering and intensity of attack by a butterfly herbivore in a polyploid herb
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
Number of Authors: 3
2015 (English)In: Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2045-7758, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 5, no 9, 1863-1872 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Timing of plant development both determines the abiotic conditions that the plant experiences and strongly influences the intensity of interactions with other organisms. Plants and herbivores differ in their response to environmental cues, and spatial and temporal variation in environmental conditions might influence the synchrony between host plants and herbivores, and the intensity of their interactions. We investigated whether differences in first day of flowering among and within 21 populations of the polyploid herb Cardamine pratensis influenced the frequency of oviposition by the butterfly Anthocharis cardamines during four study years. The proportion of plants that became oviposited upon differed among populations, but these differences were not related to mean flowering phenology within the population in any of the four study years. Attack rates in the field were also not correlated with resistance to oviposition estimated under controlled conditions. Within populations, the frequency of butterfly attack was higher in early-flowering individuals in two of the four study years, while there was no significant relationship in the other 2years. Larger plants were more likely to become oviposited upon in all 4years. The effects of first flowering day and size on the frequency of butterfly attack did not differ among populations. The results suggest that differences in attack intensities among populations are driven mainly by differences in the environmental context of populations while mean differences in plant traits play a minor role. The fact that within populations timing of flowering influenced the frequency of herbivore attack only in some years and suggests that herbivore-mediated selection on plant phenology differs among years, possibly because plants and herbivores respond differently to environmental cues.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 5, no 9, 1863-1872 p.
Keyword [en]
Anthocharis cardamines, Cardamine pratensis, cytotype, flowering phenology, herbivory, ontogeny
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-117784DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1470ISI: 000354209800010OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-117784DiVA: diva2:816199
Available from: 2015-06-02 Created: 2015-06-01 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved

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König, Malin A. E.Wiklund, ChristerEhrlén, Johan
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