Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Pathways to educational attainment in middle adulthood: the role of gender and parental educational expectations in adolescence
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
Number of Authors: 4
2014 (English)In: Gender Differences in Aspirations and Attainment: A Life Course Perspective / [ed] Schoon, I.; Eccles, J. S., Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014, 389-411 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this chapter, we apply the expectancy-value model of motivation, particularly the family socialization aspect of the model (Eccles (Parsons) et al., 1983; Eccles, 1994, 2007; Wigfield & Eccles, 2002) to address a number of key questions regarding gender differences in adult attainment, in particular educational attainment. When some individuals in the work force of today were children, what kinds of expectations did they have for themselves? What expectations did their parents have for them? Did these expectations vary for girls and boys? Were parents' expectations about their children's future education related to the actual education that these adolescents later attained in midlife? How did the child's academic ability and characteristics of the family figure into this picture? We present original empirical findings, drawing on data collected for a Swedish longitudinal study that spans from childhood to middle adulthood. In line with the expectancy-value model of motivation, the family's socioeconomic status (SES) was identified as an important predictor of several outcomes. Consistent with the model, for both genders, the family's SES and parental educational expectations in middle adolescence predicted middle adult educational attainment. The importance of grades differed by gender in that the mathematics grade was a statistically significant predictor of middle adult educational attainment for males, while for females grades in Swedish were a statistically significant predictor of middle adult educational attainment. In this chapter, we situated these study findings in the wider pertinent scholarly literature and discussed the implications of our results as they might relate to efforts to promote equitable and optimal life chances for the current generation of European girls and boys.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014. 389-411 p.
National Category
Psychology Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-117850ISI: 000351469800018ISBN: 978-1-107-64519-6 (print)ISBN: 978-1-107-02172-3 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-117850DiVA: diva2:816901
Available from: 2015-06-04 Created: 2015-06-04 Last updated: 2015-06-04Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Ferrer-Wreder, LauraBergman, Lars R.
By organisation
Department of Psychology
PsychologySociology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

isbn
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

isbn
urn-nbn
Total: 86 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf