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Educating for wise judegement and virtue in teachers
Waldorflärarhögskolan, Stockholm, Sweden.
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Being a good teacher is not only about having sufficient theoretical knowledge of pedagogy and didactics, nor of sufficient content knowledge and practical capacities in the exercise of didactics and other related aspects of teaching. Education is, as has been argued by many among them Max van Manen (1991) and Gert Biesta(2014), also a moral practice, ie. one in which teachers continually make pedagogical judgments about the appropriate intervention in a specific situation, judgments that can be regarded as either wise or unwise in retrospect. The actual intervention, for example the exercise of that tactfulness that van Manen writes of, is further influenced by the degree of tactfulness actually developed by a teacher (deliberating wisely being one thing, acting virtuously another). Although these are issues central to becoming a good teacher, few teacher-training institutions have developed an explicit and comprehensive program to deal with them. The paper will explore questions of how teacher-students can develop virtues and practical wisdom in relation to their profession. This approach proceeds from Aristotle’s virtue-ethics coupled with a narrative perspective on how to articulate and reflect on wise judgements. In short, because as Aristotle argues, virtue and practical wisdom need practice in order to develop, the practical part of teacher training becomes exceedingly important. However, a narrative approach is also needed in order to raise such wise (or unwise) judgment from a tacit realm into a public one where deliberation and systematic reflection can take place. This philosophical framework is further elaborated through Schiller’s aesthetic philosophy that allows for a more in-depth understanding of how narratives of wise judgment represent the articulated form this kind of knowing takes and thus how such narratives can also assist in developing practical wisdom. The proximity to Steiner’s concept of moral imagination is also explored briefly. The last part of the presentation is given over to a description of how this has been taken up in practice at the Waldorf teacher’s college in Stockholm, in the course of designing a new curriculum for part-time students in a program providing training for what in Sweden is called “fritidspedagog” (after school teacher or recreation instructor).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015.
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-117906OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-117906DiVA: diva2:817593
Conference
ENASTE, Vienna, Italy, May 14-16, 2015
Available from: 2015-06-05 Created: 2015-06-05 Last updated: 2017-09-11Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
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