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Large-eddy simulations of an Arctic mixed-phase stratiform cloud observed during ISDAC: sensitivity to moisture aloft, surface fluxes and large-scale forcing
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Meteorology .
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Meteorology .
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Meteorology .
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Meteorology .
Number of Authors: 4
2015 (English)In: Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, ISSN 0035-9009, E-ISSN 1477-870X, Vol. 141, no 689, 1177-1190 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Large-eddy simulation (LES) is used to examine the complex interactions between cloud properties and boundary-layer structure in Arctic low-level mixed-phase clouds using idealised conditions based on the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC, April 2008). The persistence of steady mixed-phase conditions depends mostly on a balance between ice vertical redistribution and ice growth by vapour deposition in such a way that ice crystals cannot accumulate within the cloud layer to consume the available liquid water. An external source of water vapour is necessary to balance the net sink of total water in the cloud layer. Two main local sources of moisture are present: the initial moist surface layer and the free troposphere. In the studied case, the surface layer is found to be the dominant source of vapour to the cloud, the temperature inversion preventing significant entrainment from above. In most of the cases, the simulated boundary layer becomes rapidly well-mixed despite the stabilising effect of ice sublimation and latent cooling close to the surface. The minor effect of near-surface latent cooling on stability is connected to the initially moist surface layer limiting ice sublimation. Water vapour supply in the sub-cloud layer, resulting from entrainment of moisture from aloft, reduces ice sublimation above the surface layer and contributes to the maintenance of some degree of boundary-layer decoupling. In contrast, moisture surface fluxes reduce sublimation in the surface layer and accelerate cloud-surface coupling. Overall, the persistence of cloud-surface decoupling remains mostly driven by large-scale heat and moisture advection.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 141, no 689, 1177-1190 p.
Keyword [en]
Large-eddy simulation, mixed-phase clouds, boundary-layer dynamics, Arctic clouds
National Category
Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-119002DOI: 10.1002/qj.2425ISI: 000356805700015OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-119002DiVA: diva2:843323
Available from: 2015-07-28 Created: 2015-07-24 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved

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Ekman, Annica M. L.Svensson, GunillaTjernström, Michael
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